Executive Dysfunction and Suicide in Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01043432
First received: January 4, 2010
Last updated: June 3, 2014
Last verified: June 2014

January 4, 2010
June 3, 2014
June 2010
March 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Iowa Gambling Test [ Time Frame: One time ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01043432 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Immediate and Delayed Memory Test [ Time Frame: One time ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • State Trait Anger Expression Inventory [ Time Frame: One time ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Wisconsin Card Sorting Test [ Time Frame: One time ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Executive Dysfunction and Suicide in Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients
Executive Dysfunction and Suicide in Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients

Those with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at increased risk for suicidal behavior, and suicidality is associated with executive dysfunction. In the aim of highlighting an important risk factor, this study will assess decision making in the context of an interaction between suicide and TBI. Findings will also allow for exploratory analyses aimed at identifying associations between performance on measures of executive functioning and psychological distress. The long-term objective of this study is to increase understanding regarding executive dysfunction, as a multidimensional construct, with the ultimate goal of conceptualizing assessment tools and interventions aimed at decreasing suicidality in the at-risk population of veterans with a history of TBI.

Recent studies indicate that veterans who engage in suicidal behavior have a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and veterans with a history of TBI engage in suicidal behavior. Existing research also suggests an association between suicidality and executive dysfunction (e.g., impaired decision making). To date a clearly defined study has not been conducted to explore the relationship between executive dysfunction as a multidimensional construct (i.e., decision making, impulsivity, concept formation, and aggression) and suicidal behavior in the vulnerable population of those with a history of moderate to severe TBI. Increased understanding regarding this at-risk population is necessary to facilitate the creation of appropriate assessment strategies and interventions. This study will assess decision making in the context of an interaction between suicide and TBI. Findings will also allow for exploratory analyses aimed at identifying associations between performance on measures of executive functioning and psychological distress. Toward this end, the present study seeks to compare test performance among four well-defined groups of veterans: (1) those with moderate to severe TBI and a history of suicidal behavior; (2) those with moderate to severe TBI and no history of suicidal behavior; (3) those with no TBI and a history of suicidal behavior; (4) and those with no TBI and no history of suicidal behavior. This grant proposal is in direct support of the Rehabilitation Research and Development goal of maximizing functional recovery in those with TBI by potentially: 1) increasing clinicians' ability to identify neuropsychological correlates of suicidal behavior for those with moderate to severe TBI; 2) identifying psychometrically sound measures of executive functioning that correspond to real-life behaviors that impact treatment response and recovery; 3) facilitating the creation of innovative assessment techniques and psychosocial interventions (e.g., safety planning) to minimize complications in the management of suicidal behavior due to TBI-related impairments; and 4) creating a basis for further and much-needed research in this area. Ultimately, findings from this study would both contribute to clinicians' ability to identify veterans with TBI who are at risk for suicidal behavior, and create a foundation on which to base further research regarding the relationships between cognition, emotional distress, and suicidality in TBI survivors.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample

The participants in this observational study will be all individuals willing and eligible from the following populations: 1) those admitted to the locked inpatient psychiatric unit at the Eastern Colorado Health Care System (ECHCS) Denver VA Medical Center (VAMC); 2) those seeking outpatient mental health, rehabilitative, or psychological or other services at the Denver VAMC or Colorado Springs Community Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) or other CBOC's; 3) those in an ECHCS domiciliary (e.g., Valor Point); 4) those on existing clinical and research databases; and 5) veterans in the community not seeking care within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Suicidality
Not Provided
  • Group 1
    Moderate/severe TBI and history of suicidal behavior
  • Group 2
    Moderate/Severe TBI and no history of suicidal behavior
  • Group 3
    No TBI and a history of suicidal behavior
  • Group 4
    No TBI and no history of suicidal behavior
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
286
July 2014
March 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age between 18 and 65
  • Ability to provide adequate effort (CARB score of Type 1 or 2)
  • Determination of positive or negative history of moderate or severe TBI
  • Determination of positive or negative history of suicidal behavior
  • Ability to adequately respond to questions regarding the informed consent procedure

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of neurological conditions other than moderate or severe TBI
  • Inability to adequately respond to questions regarding the informed consent procedure
  • Inability to provide adequate effort (CARB score of Type 3 or 4)
  • History of a psychotic or bipolar I mood disorder
  • History of drug or alcohol abuse in the past 7 days
  • Participating in another study in which the results of this study may be impacted
  • History of non-alcohol substance abuse within the last 30 days as identified on the SCID substance use module
  • History of same-day drug or alcohol abuse as identified on the UWRAP pre-administration questionnaire Veterans who report using substances the day of the study visit will be placed on hold and will be rescreened in 30 and 60 days
  • History of mild TBI only
Both
18 Years to 65 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01043432
D7210-R
No
Department of Veterans Affairs
Department of Veterans Affairs
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Lisa Anne Brenner, PhD VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver
Department of Veterans Affairs
June 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP