The Pandemic Stress Vaccine: A Resource to Enhance the Resilience of Healthcare Workers Facing an Infectious Outbreak

This study has been terminated.
(low participation and retention rates)
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00962273
First received: August 18, 2009
Last updated: August 17, 2010
Last verified: August 2010

August 18, 2009
August 17, 2010
October 2009
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Absenteeism [ Time Frame: 32 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00962273 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Pandemic self-efficacy [ Time Frame: 32 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Interpersonal problems [ Time Frame: 32 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Pandemic Stress Vaccine: A Resource to Enhance the Resilience of Healthcare Workers Facing an Infectious Outbreak
The Pandemic Stress Vaccine: Randomized Controlled Trial of an Educational Resource to Enhance the Resilience of Healthcare Workers Facing an Infectious Outbreak

The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of an interactive, computerized learning resource designed to increase resilience in hospital-based health care workers preparing for an influenza pandemic. The effects of the learning resource will be compared to a non-interactive learning resource condition and a control condition. It is hypothesized that (a) online pandemic-related education reduces absenteeism and interpersonal problems for healthcare workers (HCWs), and improves their pandemic self-efficacy in the short and long-term, and (b) an interactive format for online education is necessary for its benefits.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Psychological Stress
  • Behavioral: Interactive computerized learning resource
    In a series of interactive scenarios, participants can "see" themselves in stressful work situations that could arise during an influenza pandemic and reflect on effective ways to work out personal and interpersonal difficulties.
  • Behavioral: Didactic computerized learning resource
    In a non-interactive format (i.e., a series of audio presentations with accompanying PowerPoint-type slides) participants are given information on how to handle stressful work situations that could arise during an influenza pandemic.
  • Experimental: Pandemic Stress Vaccine - Interactive
    Intervention: Behavioral: Interactive computerized learning resource
  • Active Comparator: Pandemic Stress Vaccine - Didactic
    Intervention: Behavioral: Didactic computerized learning resource
  • No Intervention: Wait list
    Some participants are assigned to an eight week waiting condition prior to the course commencing.
Maunder RG, Lancee WJ, Balderson KE, Bennett JP, Borgundvaag B, Evans S, Fernandes CM, Goldbloom DS, Gupta M, Hunter JJ, McGillis Hall L, Nagle LM, Pain C, Peczeniuk SS, Raymond G, Read N, Rourke SB, Steinberg RJ, Stewart TE, VanDeVelde-Coke S, Veldhorst GG, Wasylenki DA. Long-term psychological and occupational effects of providing hospital healthcare during SARS outbreak. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Dec;12(12):1924-32.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Terminated
118
July 2010
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • employee or professional staff of a hospital

Exclusion Criteria:

  • unable to read and write English
Both
Not Provided
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT00962273
09-0133-E
No
Dr. William Lancee - Head of Research, Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital
Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: William J. Lancee, Ph.D. Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
Principal Investigator: Robert G. Maunder, M.D. Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada
August 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP