The Elite Athlete Mental Health Strategy Trial (TEAMS)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Australian Institute of Sport
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Amelia Gulliver, Australian National University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00940732
First received: July 15, 2009
Last updated: October 30, 2011
Last verified: October 2011

July 15, 2009
October 30, 2011
November 2009
October 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Help-seeking attitudes (Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help: Shortened Form, ATSPPH-SF) [ Time Frame: Baseline, post, 3 month, and 6 month follow-up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Help-seeking attitudes (Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help: Shortened Form, ATSPPH-SF) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 5 weeks and 6 month follow-up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00940732 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Help-seeking behaviour, and Help-seeking intentions (General Help-Seeking Questionnaire, GHSQ) [ Time Frame: Baseline, post, 3 month, and 6 month follow-up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Help-seeking behaviour, and Help-seeking intentions (General Help-Seeking Questionnaire, GHSQ) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 5 weeks and 6 month follow-up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Elite Athlete Mental Health Strategy Trial
The Elite Athlete Mental Health Strategy: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Online Intervention for the Mental Health Help-Seeking of Elite Athletes

The purpose of this study is to determine whether positive mental health help-seeking attitudes, and behaviour in elite athletes can be increased through an online intervention.

Mental disorders account for approximately 30% of the non-fatal disease burden in Australia, with the most prevalent disorders of depression, anxiety and substance use disorders experienced by 18% of the population in any single year. These disorders are significantly more common in young adulthood than at any other stage in the lifespan. Despite the availability of effective treatments for many disorders, this high susceptibility in young people is coupled with low rates of seeking professional help. As elite athletes have been found to have less positive attitudes towards seeking help for mental health issues, and they are most often young adults themselves, they may be even less likely than non-athletes to utilise professional services. Although there is a strong relationship between exercise and positive mental health, the prevalence of mental disorders in elite athletes is currently not known. A literature review of the general literature on help seeking and a series of focus groups with elite athletes from the Australian Institute of Sport conducted by the current research group in 2008, suggested that help-seeking by these athletes might be increased by improving their knowledge about mental health, reducing stigma, and providing feedback about the symptoms of common mental disorders.

The current project was designed to test these possibilities utilising an online format. The Elite Athlete Mental health Strategy (TEAMS) project comprises two phases: (1) a large scale survey of the mental health status of elite athletes; (2) a randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of three interventions designed to increase help seeking attitudes and help seeking behaviours related to mental disorders in elite athletes. These three interventions are: destigmatisation and mental health literacy; feedback; and a help-seeking list of resources. The study aims to compare the effectiveness of these three interventions relative to each other and a control condition.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Mental Health Help-Seeking
  • Other: Control
    No material.
  • Other: Destigmatisation and Mental Health Literacy
    Written material delivered over 2 weeks via the Internet, including "mythbusters", debunking common myths around anxiety and depression, as well information about a range of celebrities who have identified themselves as having depression or anxiety. Also contains mental health literacy information.
  • Other: Help-seeking list
    List of sources for mental health help-seeking delivered over 2 weeks.
  • Other: Feedback
    Written material delivered over 2 weeks via the Internet, including two short self-report measures (Goldberg Anxiety, Goldberg Depression), which will provide feedback to the participant about levels of depression and anxiety.
  • No Intervention: Control
    Intervention: Other: Control
  • Experimental: Destigmatisation and Mental Health Literacy
    Intervention: Other: Destigmatisation and Mental Health Literacy
  • Experimental: Help-seeking list
    Intervention: Other: Help-seeking list
  • Experimental: Feedback
    Intervention: Other: Feedback
Gulliver A, Griffiths KM, Christensen H, Mackinnon A, Calear AL, Parsons A, Bennett K, Batterham PJ, Stanimirovic R. Internet-based interventions to promote mental health help-seeking in elite athletes: an exploratory randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res. 2012 Jun 29;14(3):e69. doi: 10.2196/jmir.1864.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
200
October 2011
October 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Invited through sports organisation
  • Elite athlete
  • Able to read English

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None.
Both
18 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Australia
 
NCT00940732
2009/373
Yes
Amelia Gulliver, Australian National University
Amelia Gulliver
Australian Institute of Sport
Principal Investigator: Amelia Gulliver, BA, BAppPsych, BScPsych (Hons) The Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University
Study Chair: Kathy Griffiths, BSc (Hons), PhD The Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University
Study Director: Helen Christensen, BA (Hons), MPsych, PhD The Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University
Australian National University
October 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP