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Examining the Genetic Predictors of Coronary Artery Calcification in African Americans

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Mayo Clinic
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Patricia Peyser, University of Michigan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00925561
First received: June 19, 2009
Last updated: June 18, 2013
Last verified: June 2013

June 19, 2009
June 18, 2013
January 2009
April 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Coronary Artery Calcification [ Time Frame: Measured during participants' single study visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Coronary Artery Calcification [ Time Frame: In Adults ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00925561 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Examining the Genetic Predictors of Coronary Artery Calcification in African Americans
Predictors of Coronary Artery Calcification in an African American Cohort

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important health concern for African Americans, who are diagnosed with CAD at high rates. Coronary artery calcification, which is characterized by calcium deposits in the coronary arteries, is a contributing factor to CAD. This study will examine the possible genetic causes of coronary artery calcification in African Americans.

In the United States, more people die from CAD than any other disease, with African Americans, particularly women and young men, being more affected by CAD than European Americans. One cause of CAD is atherosclerosis, a condition in which deposits of fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up along the inner walls of arteries. Coronary artery calcification occurs as a result of atherosclerosis and is characterized by calcium build up in the arteries. Non-invasive imaging, including computed tomography (CT) scans, of coronary artery calcification is an effective way to assess CAD risk. The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) study, which is part of the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP), is a study that examined siblings with high blood pressure during two exams conducted between 1995 and 2004. The purpose of this new GENOA study, which will enroll past GENOA participants, is to identify genetic factors that may lead to the development of coronary artery calcification in African Americans. Conducting genetic studies in the African American population will result in greater understanding of the mechanisms of atherosclerosis, and may lead to improved strategies for the early identification of people at risk for CAD and the development of new treatments for CAD.

This study will enroll people who have participated in the second GENOA exam and who live in Jackson, Mississippi. Participants will attend one study visit at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. During the study visit, participants will be interviewed by study staff about their medical and family health history; health behaviors; physical activity levels; and use of tobacco, alcohol, and medications. They will complete a walking activity and tasks to assess memory, thinking speed, and accuracy. Participants will also complete a questionnaire about their mood, a physical examination, a CT scan of the heart, and a blood collection. A portion of blood will be stored for future research studies.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:

Blood to measure risk factors and stored DNA for genetic studies

Non-Probability Sample

The study population will come from Jackson, MS and will include all men and women belonging to sibships that previously participated in the second GENOA exam. The sampling frame includes 1482 African Americans in 627 sibships providing 1552 sibling pairs from Jackson, Mississippi.

Atherosclerosis
Not Provided
No treatment
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
752
April 2013
April 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participated in the second GENOA exam in Jackson, Mississippi and is alive and willing to participate

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Reported a history of heart attack, stroke, or coronary or non-coronary heart surgery
Both
20 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00925561
643, R01HL085571, 5R01 HL085571
No
Patricia Peyser, University of Michigan
University of Michigan
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  • University of Mississippi Medical Center
  • Wake Forest School of Medicine
  • Mayo Clinic
Principal Investigator: Patricia Peyser, Ph.D. University of Michigan
University of Michigan
June 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP