The Cardiovascular Benefits of Reducing Personal Exposure to Air Pollution

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing
Information provided by:
University of Edinburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00809432
First received: December 15, 2008
Last updated: NA
Last verified: December 2008
History: No changes posted

December 15, 2008
December 15, 2008
August 2008
August 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Ambulatory blood pressure [ Time Frame: During 24 hour study period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
No Changes Posted
  • Heart rate [ Time Frame: During 24 hour study period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Heart rate variability [ Time Frame: During 24 hour study period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Personal air pollution exposure [ Time Frame: During 2 hour city centre walk ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Cardiovascular Benefits of Reducing Personal Exposure to Air Pollution
Beneficial Cardiovascular Effects of Reducing Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution With a Simple Facemask

Exposure to air pollution is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and is associated with increased blood pressure, reduced heart rate variability, endothelial dysfunction and myocardial ischaemia. The study objectives were to assess the potential cardiovascular benefits of reducing personal particulate air pollution exposure by wearing a facemask in healthy volunteers.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
  • Blood Pressure
  • Heart Rate Variability
  • Device: Face mask (Dust Respirator)
    Subjects to wear a simple face mask for 24 hours prior to the study day and the 24 hours of the study day. They will be instructed to wear the mask as much as possible when indoors and at all times when outdoors.
    Other Name: 3M Dust Respirator 8812
  • Other: No Face mask
    Subjects will not wear a face mask to reduce their personal exposure to air pollution
  • Experimental: Visit 1
    2 hour city centre kerbside walk in Beijing China
    Intervention: Other: No Face mask
  • Experimental: Visit 2
    2 hour city centre kerbside walk in Beijing China
    Intervention: Device: Face mask (Dust Respirator)
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
15
August 2008
August 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy volunteers

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Current smokers
  • Significant occupational exposure to air pollution
  • Regular medication use (except oral contraceptive pill)
  • Intercurrent illness
Both
Not Provided
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
China
 
NCT00809432
167/2008/Pilot
No
Professor David E Newby, University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing
Principal Investigator: Jeremy P Langrish, MB BCh MRCP University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
December 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP