Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Panic Disorder (CBT)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00772746
First received: October 14, 2008
Last updated: NA
Last verified: October 2008
History: No changes posted

October 14, 2008
October 14, 2008
March 2006
March 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Beck anxiety inventory Sheehan disability scale fear and phobia questionnaire agoraphobia cognitions questionnaire panic and agoraphobia scale mobility inventory [ Time Frame: for observational studies ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
No Changes Posted
Beck anxiety inventory Sheehan disability scale fear and phobia questionnaire agoraphobia cognitions questionnaire panic and agoraphobia scale mobility inventory [ Time Frame: for observational studies ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Panic Disorder
Effectiveness of Specific Model of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Panic Disorder Patients With Agoraphobia

The investigators hypothesized that the group of patients receiving the medication interventions and CBT would show significant changes in their behavior, such as remission or reduction in anxiety, panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety, fear of body sensations, loss of control, and agoraphobia avoidance. And also, in the general evaluation of well-being, in the beginning and end of the treatment, in comparison to the control group (medication without CBT), during the same period.

This trial consisted in tracing the profile and evaluating their response to cognitive-behavioral techniques in a sample of 50 panic disorder patients with agoraphobia treated at the Psychiatric Institute of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil. Objective: To test a specific model of cognitive-behavioral therapy through instruments applied in the beginning and end of the procedures. Two groups of 25 patients were formed, the first one with medication and therapy and the second one with medication and without therapy, as the control group. Methods: The cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions were held weekly and individually, with one-hour sessions. The work focused on physiological, cognitive and behavioral aspects with techniques of cognitive reorganization, exercises of induction of symptoms, "in vivo" exposure, breathing and relaxation exercises. The prescribed medication consists of tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Results: There was a significant difference between the initial and final evaluation of the group with the specific therapy, such as, reduction in panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia avoidance, and fear of body sensations. In the global assessment functioning scale, global well-being increased from 60.8% to 72.5% among patients in the first group with therapy, differently from the group without therapy. We observed that 77.6% of the sample in both groups presented the respiratory subtype and 22.4% the non-respiratory subtype. Conclusion: The association of specific cognitive-behavioral therapy focusing on somatic complaints associated with pharmacologic treatment in the first group was effective in this sample, in comparison to pharmacological treatment alone in panic disorder patients with agoraphobia.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   None Retained
Description:

None retained

Non-Probability Sample

panic disoder patients over 18 years old

Panic Disorder
Not Provided
exercise
Respiratory and cognitive exercises in panic disorder patients.
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
50
March 2007
March 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients over 18 years old
  • Both genders with a diagnosis of panic disorder and agoraphobia without severe comorbidities.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients showing alcohol or drug dependence
  • Mental retardation
  • Any other severe mental disorder.
Both
18 Years to 70 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Brazil
 
NCT00772746
ALSK 021, ALK-123456-1
Yes
Antonio Egidio Nardi, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Antonio E Nardi, MD Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
October 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP