Radiation Therapy Using Gold Markers in Treating Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey ( University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00749437
First received: September 6, 2008
Last updated: June 13, 2012
Last verified: June 2012

September 6, 2008
June 13, 2012
October 2008
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Amount of the shifts of the radiation fields based on bony anatomy as compared to that of gold fiducial markers [ Time Frame: During radiation therapy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Amount of the shifts of the radiation fields based on bony anatomy as compared to that of gold fiducial markers [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00749437 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Movement of the fiducial markers themselves and the change in volume of the seroma cavity during a 15-fraction course of accelerated radiotherapy compared with the pre-radiation volume [ Time Frame: During radiation therapy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Movement of the fiducial markers themselves and the change in volume of the seroma cavity during a 15-fraction course of accelerated radiotherapy compared with the pre-radiation volume [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Radiation Therapy Using Gold Markers in Treating Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Feasibility of 3-D Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) for Early Stage, Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Using Acculoc Fiducial Markers: A Phase I Trial

RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Placing gold markers in the area where the tumor was removed may help doctors better direct radiation therapy and help reduce the risk of cancer recurrence.

PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying how well radiation therapy using gold markers works in treating women with early-stage breast cancer.

OBJECTIVES:

Primary

  • To determine if the delivery of external-beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) based on gold fiducial markers is more accurate when compared to the delivery of radiotherapy based on bony anatomy in women with early-stage, node-negative breast cancer.

Secondary

  • To assess the migration of fiducial markers during a course of APBI.
  • To quantify the change in the volume of the seroma (lumpectomy) cavity during a course of APBI.
  • To compare overall operative time for suturing fiducial markers into place vs current standard method of placing surgical clips.

OUTLINE: Patients undergo planned lumpectomy with gold fiducial marker placement (if procedure not already performed). Patients who meet the post lumpectomy criteria for continue treatment in this study proceed to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Between 15-80 days after surgery, patients undergo 3-dimensional APBI (may be intensity-modulated radiotherapy) using CT-guided planning (with gold fiducial markers placed at lumpectomy) once daily, 5 days a week, for 15 days.

Patients undergo fluoroscopy weekly to determine real-time movement of bony anatomy and fiducial markers and cone-beam CT weekly to determine any change in volume of seroma cavity.

Interventional
Phase 1
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Breast Cancer
Radiation: 3-dimensional conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation
Accelerated partial breast irradiation following lumpectomy with placement of Acculoc fiducial markers.
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
34
July 2010
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:

Inclusion criteria:

  • Histologically confirmed ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast (including ductal, medullary, papillary, colloid [mucinous], or tubular histologies) meeting all of the following criteria:

    • AJCC stage 0, I, or II (Tis, T1N0, or T2N0) disease with a lesion ≤ 3 cm treated with lumpectomy and either sentinel node biopsy or axillary dissection (if invasive carcinoma is present)
    • Unifocal breast cancer (i.e., single focus that can be encompassed by one lumpectomy)
  • Underwent or plan to undergo lumpectomy with placement of gold fiducial markers (markers placed concurrently with the surgery or on a later date)

    • Patients who has underwent lumpectomy must meet all of the following criteria:

      • Must be enrolled between 14-60 days from date of last surgery, and radiation must start within 15-80 days of date of last surgery
      • Four to six gold fiducial markers placed in the tumor bed, delineating the margins of the lumpectomy cavity
      • Negative, inked histologic margins of lumpectomy (> 1 mm) or re-excision specimen to be confirmed prior to radiation

        • Margins are unacceptable if there is invasive or non-invasive tumor within 1 mm of the inked margin
  • Negative post-excision mammography if malignancy-associated microcalcifications were initially present
  • Hormone receptor status not specified

Exclusion criteria:

  • Evidence of suspicious microcalcifications in the breast prior to the start of radiation
  • One or more positive axillary nodes or positive sentinel biopsy
  • Distant metastases
  • Invasive or extensive in-situ lobular carcinoma or non-epithelial breast malignancies such as sarcoma or lymphoma
  • Proven multicentric carcinoma (tumors in different quadrants of the breast or tumor separated by at least 4 cm) with other clinically or radiographically suspicious areas in the ipsilateral breast unless confirmed to be negative for malignancy by biopsy
  • Palpable or radiographically suspicious contralateral axillary, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or internal mammary nodes, unless there is histologic confirmation that these nodes are negative for tumor
  • Paget's disease of the nipple
  • Skin involvement, regardless of tumor size

PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Female
  • Menopausal status not specified
  • ECOG performance status 0-1
  • Life expectancy ≥ 2 years
  • Not pregnant or nursing
  • No prior treated breast carcinoma within the past 5 years
  • No collagen vascular diseases, specifically systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, or dermatomyositis
  • No co-existing medical conditions
  • No patients with medical conditions that would preclude compliance with the trial, as determined by the investigator
  • No other malignancy, except non-melanomatous skin cancer, within the past 5 years

    • Disease-free interval from any prior carcinoma must be continuous
  • No breast technically unsuitable for radiotherapy

PRIOR CONCURRENT THERAPY:

  • See Disease Characteristics
  • Concurrent tamoxifen citrate, anastrozole, or other hormonal therapy allowed
  • Future chemotherapy allowed provided it is administered after the APBI and begins no earlier than 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy
  • No tylectomies so extensive that the cosmetic result is low or poor prior to radiation
  • No prior radiation to the ipsilateral breast
  • No prior non-hormonal therapy or radiotherapy for this disease
  • No chemotherapy in the past 2 weeks
  • No concurrent chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or experimental medications
Female
45 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00749437
040801, P30CA072720, CINJ-040801, CINJ-0220080173
No
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey ( University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey )
University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Principal Investigator: Bruce G. Haffty, MD Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
June 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP