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Prazosin for Treatment of Patients With Alcohol Dependence (AD) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified January 2014 by Yale University
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Yale University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Elizabeth Ralevski, Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00744055
First received: August 28, 2008
Last updated: January 14, 2014
Last verified: January 2014

August 28, 2008
January 14, 2014
January 2009
October 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Drinking measures [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • PTSD symptoms [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00744055 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
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Prazosin for Treatment of Patients With Alcohol Dependence (AD) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
The Use of Prazosin for Treatment of Patients With Alcohol Dependence (AD) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Prazosin is an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist that has been used successfully in the treatment of trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance in combat veterans with PTSD, and alcohol dependence.

The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of prazosin (16mg) versus placebo in reducing alcohol consumption and decreasing symptoms of PTSD in patients with comorbid AD and PTSD.

Background:

There is a high rate of comorbidity with alcohol dependence (AD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The rates of PTSD among individuals with AD are at least twice as high as those in the general population. In addition, alcohol dependence is the most common comorbid condition in men with PTSD. Despite this, little is known about how to best treat individuals with comorbid AD and PTSD. The use of an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist represents a novel approach to treatment that may target symptoms of both AD and PTSD. There is evidence of common neurobiological mechanisms that underlie both AD and PTSD. Prazosin is an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist that has been used successfully in the treatment of trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance in combat veterans with PTSD, and alcohol dependence.

Objective:

The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of prazosin (16mg) versus placebo in reducing alcohol consumption and decreasing symptoms of PTSD in patients with comorbid AD and PTSD. Methods: Thirty participants with a current diagnosis of AD and PTSD will be enrolled in a 13-week trial. They will be assigned, in a double-blind fashion, to either prazosin or placebo. Significance: This project will be the first to compare prazosin to placebo as effective treatments for reducing alcohol consumption and PTSD symptoms in patients with both AD and PTSD.

Interventional
Phase 3
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Alcohol Dependence
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
Drug: Prazosin
prazosin (16mg/day) 2 times a day
Placebo Comparator: 1
comparison between prazosin (16mg/day) vs placebo
Intervention: Drug: Prazosin
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
120
October 2014
October 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Males and females between the ages of 21-65 years old.
  2. Current alcohol dependence, as determined by a structured clinical interview (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders) (SCID) (First et al. 1996).
  3. Current PTSD as determined by the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV(CAPS) (Blake et al. 1995).
  4. Patients with current alcohol dependence, with at least one recent episode of heavy drinking (defined as 5 or more drinks per drinking episode) over the past 14 days.
  5. Medically and neurologically healthy on the basis of history, physical examination, EKG, screening laboratories (CBC w/ differential, TSH, Free-T4, ASAT, ALAT, GGT, BUN, creatinine, calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, total protein, albumin, electrolytes, VDRL, urinalysis, beta-HCG).
  6. For women, negative pregnancy test and use of acceptable method of contraception.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Females who are pregnant or lactating.
  2. Individuals with a current unstable medical condition such as neurological, cardiovascular, endocrine, renal, liver, or thyroid pathology (LFT 5 times normal, abnormal BUN and creatinine, and unmanaged hypertension with BP more than 200/120) which in the opinion of the physician would preclude the patient from fully cooperating or be of potential harm during the course of the study.
  3. Patients who meet current SCID criteria for the following major Axis I diagnoses (Bipolar Disorders, Schizophrenia and Schizophrenia-type Disorders).
  4. History of substance dependence (other than alcohol, cocaine, tobacco or cannabis) by DSM-IV criteria in the last 30 days.
  5. Individuals taking mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications.
  6. Individuals with a history of sensitivity to quinazolines or prazosin.
  7. Individuals taking medications thought to influence alcohol consumption (naltrexone, disulfiram, acamprosate).
  8. Individuals taking adrenergic medication (e.g. clonidine).
  9. Agents that may interact with prazosin such as drugs with CNS depressant effects including tizanidine and xyrem.
Both
21 Years to 65 Years
No
Contact: Elizabeth Ralevski, Ph.D. 203-932-5711 ext 4282 elizabeth.ralevski@yale.edu
United States
 
NCT00744055
00032
Yes
Elizabeth Ralevski, Yale University
Elizabeth Ralevski
Yale University
Principal Investigator: Ismene Petrakis, MD Yale University
Yale University
January 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP