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Effectiveness of a Web-Based Intervention for Guardians of Children Whose One Parent Has Murdered the Other

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2009 by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00737035
First received: August 14, 2008
Last updated: April 28, 2009
Last verified: April 2009

August 14, 2008
April 28, 2009
July 2008
March 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales (F-COPES) [ Time Frame: Measured at 16 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00737035 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Parenting Stress Index (PSI) [ Time Frame: Measured at 16 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/6-18) Parent form [ Time Frame: Measured at 16 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Child PTSD Inventory-Parent (CPTSDI-P): [ Time Frame: Measured at 16 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effectiveness of a Web-Based Intervention for Guardians of Children Whose One Parent Has Murdered the Other
Testing an IHCA for Guardians of Survivors of Intraparental Homicide

This study will determine whether a specialized Web site geared for the guardians of children whose one parent has murdered the other can increase guardian capabilities, reduce guardian stress, and improve child behavior and mental health.

Intraparental homicide (IPH), when one parent kills the other, leaves approximately 4,000 children bereaved each year, adding to a total of 70,000 currently in the United States. Although few studies have focused on this phenomenon, available data indicate children of IPH suffer short- and long-term mental health consequences, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prior research also indicates that guardians, often family members under stress themselves, do not know how to help the children. No interventions directed at guardians of child survivors of IPH are found in scientific and clinical literature. Use of a specialized Web site called an Interactive Healthcare Communication Application (IHCA) has been found effective in treating multiple health conditions, including breast cancer in women and asthma in children. This study aims to refine an IHCA Web site for use by guardians of child survivors of IPH, to determine the safety and effectiveness of this Web site, and to determine how it is used by targeted guardians.

In the first phase of this study researchers will develop the IHCA based on feedback from a small focus group of guardians of child survivors of IPH. Then guardians of survivors of IPH up to 16 years old will be randomly assigned either to receive access to the IHCA created for them or to have access only to generally available Internet information. The IHCA will have six components: (1) an Instant Library of articles on topics of interest; (2) a resource directory of both national and local support and service organizations; (3) access to a peer communication system; (4) a Frequently Asked Questions section, updated with responses to user generated questions; (5) an "Ask an Expert" system staffed by researchers; and (6) personal stories of others dealing with IPH. Participants with access to the IHCA will receive print and phone instructions explaining the Web site and have their usage monitored by tracking software. Those in the control group will be directed to a Web site linking to publically available, pre-existing support Web sites. After 16 weeks of unlimited access to the IHCA or control group Web sites from their home computers, all participants will complete four evaluation reviews: the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales, the Parenting Stress Index, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Child PTSD Inventory - Parent.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Behavioral: Interactive Healthcare Communication Application
    The IHCA is an Internet-based tool that integrates multiple resources for guardians of survivors of interparental homicide. The IHCA will have six components: (1) an instant library of articles on topics of interest; (2) a resource directory of both national and local support and service organizations; (3) access to a peer communication system; (4) a Frequently Asked Questions section, updated with responses to user generated questions; (5) an "Ask an Expert" system staffed by researchers; and (6) personal stories of others dealing with IPH.
    Other Name: IHCA
  • Behavioral: Control Web sites
    Only publicly available Web sites on parenting, child development, and trauma will be used.
  • Experimental: 1-Intervention
    For 16 weeks, participants will have access to an interactive healthcare communication application (IHCA).
    Intervention: Behavioral: Interactive Healthcare Communication Application
  • Active Comparator: 2- Control
    For 16 weeks, participants will have access to generally available Internet-based information about parenting, trauma, and child development.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Control Web sites

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
126
June 2010
March 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Able to speak and read English at a 7th grade level
  • Guardian of a child survivor of parental homicide aged 0 to 16 years

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None
Both
18 Years and older
Yes
Contact: Kathryn S. Laughon, PhD, RN 434-962-3335 klaughon@virginia.edu
United States
 
NCT00737035
R21 MH082197, 1R21MH082197 - 01A1, DDTR B3-PDS
Yes
Kathryn Laughon, PhD RN, University of Virginia School of Nursing
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Kathryn S. Laughon, PhD RN University of Virginia School of Nursing
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
April 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP