A Motivational Enhancement Approach to Skin Cancer Prevention

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Oregon Health and Science University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00705887
First received: June 25, 2008
Last updated: NA
Last verified: June 2008
History: No changes posted

June 25, 2008
June 25, 2008
September 2006
June 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
UV Protection Stages of Change [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
No Changes Posted
  • UV Protection Attitudes [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • UV Protection Self-Efficacy [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
A Motivational Enhancement Approach to Skin Cancer Prevention
The Feasibility of a Motivational Enhancement Approach to Skin Cancer Prevention in a Sample of Young Adult Patients

The specific aims of this research are:

Aim 1 - To describe the UV protection behaviors and beliefs of young adult patients in a dermatology clinic.

Aim 2 - To examine whether or not the UV protection behaviors and beliefs of young adult dermatology patients are associated with age, gender, level of education, marital status, contact with skin cancer, time outdoors, skin type, the reason for their visit, and the date of data collection.

Aim 3 - To test the efficacy of a motivational enhancement approach to UV protection counseling for young adult dermatology patients, as manifested by favorable changes in UV protection stages of change, UV protection self-efficacy, and UV protection attitudes.

Although skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, it is highly preventable by reducing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, recent primary prevention efforts have been inadequate in evoking behavior change, as manifested by increasing rates of ultraviolet radiation exposure, particularly among young adults. These findings indicate the need to research novel approaches to skin cancer prevention.

Motivational enhancement techniques facilitate patient-centered, directive discussions wherein practitioners provide clear structure and encourage patients to play an active role in the consultation. The use of motivational enhancement techniques for health behavior change in medical settings has thus far yielded encouraging results for other health behavior change topics, but research has not yet investigated the application of these techniques to skin cancer prevention discussions.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Ultraviolet Rays
  • Motivation
Behavioral: Brief Motivational Enhancement Intervention
The motivational enhancement intervention lasted 5-8 minutes and consisted of gaining the client's permission to address the topic of skin cancer prevention, exchanging information through the elicit-provide-elicit strategy of information exchange, and summarization/ conclusion based on verbal and nonverbal cues from the participant.
Other Name: Adaptation of Motivational Interviewing
  • No Intervention: Control
    Brochure from the American Academy of Dermatology on protecting your skin from UV rays.
  • Experimental: Intervention
    Participation in a brief motivational enhancement session. These participants also received the same American Academy of Dermatology brochure on protecting your skin from UV rays.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Brief Motivational Enhancement Intervention
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
82
June 2007
June 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Dermatology patient presenting for scheduled appointment
  • 18-30 years old

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Seeking treatment for sunburn
  • Unable to read and understand English
  • Having previously received medical treatment from the interventionist
Both
18 Years to 30 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00705887
IRB00002996
No
Christina P. Linton, FNP-BC, PhD, Oregon Health & Science University
Oregon Health and Science University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Christina P Linton, FNP-BC, PhD Oregon Health and Science University
Study Chair: Nancy Press, PhD Oregon Health and Science University
Oregon Health and Science University
June 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP