Head Movement Effect on Different Tracheal Tubes

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified May 2008 by The Hospital for Sick Children.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
The Hospital for Sick Children
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00687583
First received: May 28, 2008
Last updated: NA
Last verified: May 2008
History: No changes posted

May 28, 2008
May 28, 2008
April 2007
December 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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No Changes Posted
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Head Movement Effect on Different Tracheal Tubes
Effect of Head Movement on the Position of Different Tracheal Tubes Determined Radiologically

A breathing tube, which is used to secure the airway and allow ventilation of the lungs during general anaesthesia, is inserted into the windpipe either through the nose or mouth. In children, different formulas exist to determine the appropriate size of the tube according to age, and how far it should be advanced into the airway. Head movement can alter the position of the breathing tube, making it go in or come out too far. Different types of breathing tubes may also differ in their change of position with head movement. The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of the formulae commonly used in our institution for depth of breathing tube placement, and to measure the degree of tube displacement on head movement with different types of tubes.

An endotracheal tube, which is used to secure the airway and allow ventilation of the lungs during general anesthesia, is inserted into the trachea either through the nose or mouth. In children, different formulae exist to determine the approximate size of the tube according to age, and how far it should be advanced into the airway. Once a tracheal tube is inserted, its position is routinely checked to make sure both lungs are ventilated. To prevent displacement, the tube is taped to the lip, chin or at the nose. However, head movement could cause alteration of the tube position, and risk selective endobronchial intubation or inadvertent extubation. Knowledge of how the different tracheal tubes move with head position can help determine the best tube selection to reduce the risk of accidental tube advancement or removal, in cases where certain head positions are required for surgical access.

The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of the formulae commonly used in our institution for depth of breathing tube placement, and to measure the degree of tube displacement on head movement with different types of tube. Testing the formulae will enable us to be more aware of how frequently inaccurate tube placement may occur. Knowledge of how the different breathing tubes move with head position can help determine the best tube selection to reduce the risk of the tube going in too far or coming out accidentally, for cases were certain head positions are required for surgery.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

Fifty children undergoing any procedure in the Image Guided Therapy (IGT) department requiring tracheal intubation and chest X-ray, will be recruited and will be evenly distributed in three different age groups (0 to 6 months, 6 to 24 months, 24 months to 6 years).

  • Head Movements
  • Intubation, Intratracheal
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
50
January 2009
December 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Children undergoing any procedure in the Image Guided Therapy (IGT) department requiring tracheal intubation and chest x-ray

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Premature neonates
  • Patients with cranio-facial anomalies
  • Cervical spine/upper thoracic anomalies
  • Laryngomalacia/tracheomalacia
  • Chronic hypoxemia (i.e. cardiac conditions with right to left shunts)
  • Patients requiring positions other than supine
Both
up to 6 Years
No
Contact: Cengiz Karsli, MD 416-813-1500 ext 7341 cengiz.karsli@sickkids.ca
Canada
 
NCT00687583
1000010579
No
Cengiz Karsli/Principal Investigator, The Hospital for Sick Children
The Hospital for Sick Children
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Cengiz Karsli, MD The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto Canada
The Hospital for Sick Children
May 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP