Activating Seniors to Improve Chronic Disease Care

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making
Information provided by:
University of California, Los Angeles
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00651495
First received: March 28, 2008
Last updated: December 3, 2008
Last verified: December 2008

March 28, 2008
December 3, 2008
April 2008
November 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Decision-making role preferences [ Time Frame: 20 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Attitudes, perceived social norms and self efficacy for asking questions of a physician [ Time Frame: 20 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00651495 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Health-related quality of life [ Time Frame: 20 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Activating Seniors to Improve Chronic Disease Care
Activating Seniors to Improve Chronic Disease Care

Chronic diseases are the primary cause of morbidity and mortality for older Americans. Active patient participation in treatment decision-making has the potential to significantly improve outcomes in chronic disease care, but interventions to increase participation remain underused. Some studies have found that older individuals are less interested in participating in clinical decision-making, but other studies find that exposing patients to decision aids (PtDAs) increases their desire to take an active role in making decisions with their physicians. The present study targets hard-to-reach seniors by showing decision aids focused on chronic disease management in senior centers. Decision aids will be made available in two senior centers through a lending library and by conducting group screenings of the decision aids followed by moderated discussion of the content with participants. A randomized encouragement design will be used to test the effectiveness of a modest financial incentive on increasing seniors' participation in group screenings. The investigators will evaluate the effects of the intervention on seniors' decision-making role preferences, attitudes, perceived social norms and self efficacy for asking questions of their physician, health-related quality of life, physical activity, and changes in prescribed treatment regimens and self-care.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Healthy
Behavioral: Patient decision aids for chronic conditions
Videos providing comprehensive information about chronic disease management
  • Experimental: 1
    Participants receive a $50 financial incentive if they view at least 3 of 5 patient decision aids in a group screening.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Patient decision aids for chronic conditions
  • Active Comparator: 2
    No financial incentive for watching patient decision aids in group screenings
    Intervention: Behavioral: Patient decision aids for chronic conditions
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
116
November 2008
November 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • At least 55 years old.
  • Able to ambulate
  • Able to complete self-administered surveys
  • Able to speak and read English

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Not willing to provide consent
Both
55 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00651495
G07-09-025, FIMDM 0096-1
No
Dominick Frosch, Principal Investigator, UCLA
University of California, Los Angeles
Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making
Principal Investigator: Dominick L Frosch, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles
December 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP