The Effects of Breakfast on Brain Function

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
University of Arkansas
Information provided by:
Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00621595
First received: February 12, 2008
Last updated: August 19, 2009
Last verified: August 2009

February 12, 2008
August 19, 2009
November 2000
June 2005   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00621595 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Effects of Breakfast on Brain Function
The Effects of Breakfast on Cognitive Functioning

To test cognitive abilities of 8-11 year old children under conditions of fasting or receiving a full school breakfast.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Healthy
Dietary Supplement: USDA School Breakfast
Breakfast containing 340 calories, 57 g carbohydrate, 14 g protein, 6 g fat.
Active Comparator: 1
Fasting
Intervention: Dietary Supplement: USDA School Breakfast
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
166
June 2005
June 2005   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 8-11 years old
  • Between 25th and 95th percentile, BMI-for-age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • food allergies or some intolerances
  • uncorrected vision
  • IQ < 80
  • Other chronic conditions thought to interfere with the study as determined by the investigator
Both
8 Years to 11 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00621595
06278
No
R. Terry Pivik, Ph.D. / Principal Investigator, University of Arkansas for Medical Science
Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute
  • USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
  • University of Arkansas
Principal Investigator: R Terry Pivik, Ph.D. University of Arkansas for Medial Science
Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute
August 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP