Vitamin D Levels in Children With IBD

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified January 2009 by Children's Hospital Boston.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Crohn's and Colitis Foundation
North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Information provided by:
Children's Hospital Boston
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00621257
First received: February 11, 2008
Last updated: January 27, 2009
Last verified: January 2009

February 11, 2008
January 27, 2009
January 2008
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Treatment of low 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00621257 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Maintenance of 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Vitamin D Levels in Children With IBD
Optimization of Vitamin D Stores and Its Impact on the Bone Health and Disease Outcomes of Children and Adolescents With IBD.

Research has shown that children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease may have lower levels of vitamin D than healthy children, especially in the winter. Vitamin D is important for growing and maintaining healthy bones throughout life, and this is particularly important, since children with IBD frequently have low bone density. It may also be helpful in the treatment of IBD itself, because it helps reduce inflammation. Vitamin D levels are measured by the amount of 25 OHD in the blood; however, measuring this level on a regular basis is not yet the standard for children with IBD. The purpose of this study is to find the best way to treat low vitamin D levels, and to maintain good vitamin D levels throughout the year. It will also test whether having higher vitamin D levels will improve the bone health of children with IBD, and whether it will help them have milder disease.

Vitamin D is essential for bone mineralization. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency [serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration (25OHD) ≤ 20 ng/mL] is high among adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and even higher in pediatric patients with IBD. Protein-losing enteropathy could represent both an etiologic factor for hypovitaminosis D, and an obstacle in treating it in IBD patients. There are currently no guidelines for the treatment of hypovitaminosis D in adults or children with IBD. Moreover we have obtained evidence that optimal vitamin D stores (25OHD ≥32 ng/mL) may not be maintained throughout the year in patients with IBD following current RDA recommendations. On the other hand, the prevalence of low bone mineral density is high among young patients with IBD, during a period in their lives when they should experience the most rapid acquisition of bone mass. Optimization of vitamin D status and its impact on the bone health of children with IBD has not been studied. In addition, vitamin D may play an important role in the regulation of the immune system as supported by animal models of colitis and in vitro human studies.

Prospective studies of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on disease outcomes have not been undertaken in children with IBD to date. We aim to perform a) a randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy of 3 regimens in treating vitamin D insufficiency in pediatric patients with IBD over a period of 6 weeks. We will also evaluate the effects of each regimen on markers of bone resorption, bone formation and parathyroid hormone levels, and the relationship between the magnitude of gastrointestinal protein loss, as reflected by clearance of fecal alpha -1-antitrypsin, and the efficacy of the treatment. b) We also aim to perform a randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy of 2 regimens of different doses of oral vitamin D2 in maintaining optimal vitamin D stores in pediatric patients with IBD over a period of 2 years. We intend to study the effect of each regimen on a) bone mass acquisition (measured via DXA and pQCT) and bone strength (measured via pQCT), b) bone formation and resorption markers and parathyroid hormone, and c) disease outcomes and disease severity over the same period of time.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Crohn's Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol
    8000 units/ml
    Other Name: Vitamin D2
  • Dietary Supplement: Cholecalciferol
    400 units per drop
    Other Name: Vitamin D3
  • Active Comparator: Treatment A
    2,000 IU/day of vitamin D2 orally for 6 weeks (control arm)
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol
  • Active Comparator: Treatment B
    2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3 orally for 6 weeks
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Cholecalciferol
  • Active Comparator: Treatment C
    50,000 IU of vitamin D2 once a week orally for 6 weeks
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol
  • Active Comparator: Maintenance A
    400 IU/day of vitamin D2 orally over 2 years (control arm)
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol
  • Active Comparator: Maintenance B
    2,000 IU/day of vitamin D2 orally from November 1 to April 30, and 1,000 IU/day of vitamin D2 orally for the remainder of the year over 2 years
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
120
January 2012
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Clinical diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease
  • serum 25OHD level ≤ 20 ng/mL (Treatment Trial)
  • serum 25OHD level > 20 ng/mL (Maintenance Trial)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients unable to take medications by mouth, pregnant, with liver/kidney failure, receiving anticonvulsant medications (specifically, phenobarbital, carbamazepine and phenytoin, since they lead to increased vitamin D metabolism through hepatic induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) hydroxylase enzymes), regularly attending a tanning salon (once weekly or more), currently being treated for hypovitaminosis D with therapeutic doses of vitamin D (> 800 IU per day) and unwilling to discontinue this regimen.
  • patients on growth hormone, anabolic steroid hormones, calcitonin, bisphosphonates (Maintenance Trial only)
Both
5 Years to 21 Years
No
Contact: Helen Pappa, MD, MPH 617-355-2962 helen.pappa@childrens.harvard.edu
Contact: Tracee Saslowsky, MSN 617-355-4204 tracee.saslowsky@childrens.harvard.edu
United States
 
NCT00621257
1K23DK076979-01A1
Yes
Helen Pappa, MD, MPH, Children's Hospital, Boston
Children's Hospital Boston
  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
  • Crohn's and Colitis Foundation
  • North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Principal Investigator: Helen Pappa, MD, MPH Children's Hospital Boston
Children's Hospital Boston
January 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP