Systemic Reactions to Allergen Immunotherapy Amd Skin Testing (chackos)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of South Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00594802
First received: January 4, 2008
Last updated: August 5, 2010
Last verified: July 2008

January 4, 2008
August 5, 2010
August 2006
June 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
This is a prospective observational study of patients who are having either skin testing or allergen immunotherapy for the diagnosis or treatment of allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and/or asthma. [ Time Frame: UNKNOWN ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00594802 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Systemic Reactions to Allergen Immunotherapy Amd Skin Testing
Systemic Reactions to Allergen Immunotherapy Amd Skin Testing

Allergy skin tests and allergen immunotherapy are common procedures for both the diagnosis and treatment of atopic diseases. Allergen immunotherapy has proved to be effective in reducing the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma1-2. Despite its clinical benefit, there is risk of systemic reactions associated with these procedures.

The systemic reaction rate to skin testing for aeroallergens is significant lower than the rate of reactions to immunotherapy, but it is not negligible. Lin et al reported only 2 patients who had systemic allergic reactions to skin testing for respiratory allergies in 10,400 patients tested.3 They determined the overall risk of inducing anaphylactic reactions by skin testing to be less than 0.02% and other studies have produced similar results.4-5 The rate of systemic reactions to skin testing is likely underscored. Thompson et. al reported a systemic reaction rate of 6% of patients receiving skin testing.6 It is important to recognize the risk of systemic reactions seeing skin testing is commonly done. It is also imperative to recognize the treatments for these reactions to prevent progression.

Hypothesis The systemic reaction rate to allergen immunotherapy and skin testing to aeroallergens is higher than previously reported. Biphasic anaphylactic reactions rarely occur with allergen immunotherapy and skin testing.

Not Provided
Observational
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample

Male and female subjects who are receiving skin testing or allergen immunotherapy from one allergy practice.

SYSTEMIC REACTION
Not Provided
CHART REVIEW ONLY
CHART REVIEW OF PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC REACTIONS
Bagg A, Chacko T, Lockey R. Reactions to prick and intradermal skin tests. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2009 May;102(5):400-2.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
100
June 2007
June 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male and female subjects who are receiving skin testing or allergen immunotherapy from one allergy practice.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • NON Male and female subjects who are receiving skin testing or allergen immunotherapy from one allergy practice.
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00594802
systemic reaction protocol
No
DR. RICHARD F LOCKEY, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA
University of South Florida
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: RICHARD F LOCKEY, MD USF DIRECTOR OF ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
University of South Florida
July 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP