Evaluating the Relationship Between Tobacco Use, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Panic in Adolescents

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rosemary Ruff, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00535964
First received: September 25, 2007
Last updated: April 9, 2013
Last verified: April 2013

September 25, 2007
April 9, 2013
June 2007
April 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Relationship between cigarette smoking and panic vulnerability [ Time Frame: Measured at completion of laboratory testing analysis ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00535964 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Evaluating the Relationship Between Tobacco Use, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Panic in Adolescents
Anxiety Sensitivity, Tobacco Use, and Panic Among Adolescents

This study will determine whether there is a relationship between tobacco use and a heightened response to panic-producing events among adolescents. This study is fundamental research. It was not a Clinical Trial.

Growing up is hard enough, and adolescence can be a particularly stressful time in people's lives as they adjust to the transition from childhood to adulthood. Peer pressure can add to this anxiety, making it more likely for teens to take part in risky behaviors such as smoking cigarettes. Every day, more than 4,000 teens smoke their first cigarette and nearly half of those teens will become regular, daily smokers. Cigarette smoking is associated with a multitude of health risks, including an increased likelihood of experiencing panic attacks, anxiety disorders, and depression. This study will evaluate a group of teens, ranging from those who have never smoked to those who smoke daily, to determine whether there is a relation between adolescent smoking history and their vulnerability to panic-producing situations.

Participants in this study will undergo a brief medical screening, followed by a short interview that will include several questionnaires regarding emotions, experiences, and personal habits. Participants will then attend a series of laboratory assessments for 1 hour. The first assessment will include a 3-minute voluntary hyperventilation procedure in which participants will be directed when to breathe in and when to breathe out, at a faster rate than normal. Participants will then take part in two computerized tasks: one will be a computerized task that involves blowing up a balloon and deciding when to quit before the balloon pops; the other task will involve choosing hypothetical amounts of money now or after a period of delay. During the laboratory assessments, all participants will have electrodes attached to their bodies and sensors around their chests to measure heart rate, palm sweating, and muscle tension. Results from this study will be used to evaluate the association between smoking and increased panic levels under stressful conditions among adolescents.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

Participants will be 180 psychologically healthy adolescents, evenly divided across the various stages of smoking uptake (i.e., non-smokers, tried smoking, experimenters, regular smokers, and daily smokers).

Panic Disorder
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1
Psychologically healthy adolescents, evenly divided across the various stages of smoking uptake
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
180
April 2009
April 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adolescents, ranging from those who have never smoked to those who smoke daily

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Current or past diagnosis of a panic disorder
  • Acute or chronic cardiopulmonary or respiratory illness (e.g., asthma or bronchitis)
  • Pregnant
Both
12 Years to 17 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00535964
R03 MH077692, R03MH077692, DAHBR 96-BHB
No
Rosemary Ruff, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Principal Investigator: Ellen W. Leen-Feldner, PhD University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
April 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP