Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction in Young and Older People

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2009 by National Institute on Aging (NIA).
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00506428
First received: April 27, 2007
Last updated: April 28, 2009
Last verified: April 2009

April 27, 2007
April 28, 2009
December 2006
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Changes in sleep and waking EEG measures [ Time Frame: During 3-week chronic sleep restriction segment of inpatient study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • frequent measures of performance, attention, alertness, and memory [ Time Frame: During 3-week chronic sleep restriction segment of inpatient study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • measures of cardiovascular and metabolic function [ Time Frame: During 3-week chronic sleep restriction segment of inpatient study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Changes in sleep and waking EEG measures
  • frequent measures of performance, attention, alertness, and memory
  • measures of cardiovascular and metabolic function
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00506428 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
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Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction in Young and Older People
Sleep, Aging, and Circadian Rhythm Disorders

The purpose of this study is to examine the consequences of chronic sleep restriction on nighttime sleep, daytime alertness, performance and memory functions, and metabolic and cardiovascular function, and to determine if the consequences of chronic sleep restriction differ between healthy young and older adults.

It has long been recognized that sleep patterns change with age. A common feature of aging is the advance of the timing of sleep to earlier hours, often earlier than desired. Polysomnographically-recorded sleep in older people shows an increased number of awakenings, a reduction of stages 3 and 4 (SWS) sleep, and a flattening of REM sleep distribution throughout the night. These age-related changes are found in even healthy individuals who are not taking medications and who are free from sleep disorders. In addition to these sleep disturbances, many older individuals curtail their sleep voluntarily, reporting similar rates of sleep restriction (sleeping less than 7 or less than 6 hours per night) as young adults. Whether voluntary or not, insufficient sleep has medical, safety and metabolic consequences. In fact, converging evidence in young adults suggests that sleep restriction per se may impair metabolism, and that reduced sleep duration is associated with weight gain, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality.

The study begins with 21 days of outpatient study in which the participants will be required to sleep for 10 hours each night in order to ensure they are well-rested. This will be followed by a 39-day inpatient study. The study will begin with 3 "sleep satiation" days during which all participants will be scheduled to sleep for 12 hours per night and have a 4 hour nap each afternoon. This is followed by 3 baseline days in which the participants will follow the same sleep-wake schedule they were following at home. Following this, the participant will undergo 3 weeks of chronic sleep restriction while living on a non-24-hour schedule. The participant will live on a schedule that is equivalent to 5.6 hours of sleep per 24 hours. Following these 3 weeks, the participant will be scheduled to again sleep for 10 hours per night for 10 nights.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
  • Aging
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Metabolic Syndrome
Behavioral: chronic sleep restriction
5.6 hours of sleep per 24 hours for 3 weeks
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
25
June 2011
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Chronic or acute medical condition
  • Medication use
  • Depression
  • History of psychiatric illness
  • Sleep disorder
Both
18 Years to 70 Years
Yes
United States
 
NCT00506428
AG0077, 2P01AG009975-11
No
Charles A Czeisler, PhD, MD, Brigham & Women's Hospital
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Charles A Czeisler, PhD, MD Brigham and Women's Hospital
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
April 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP