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Kangaroo Holding Effects on Breast Milk

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of Delaware
Information provided by:
Christiana Care Health Services
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00418106
First received: January 2, 2007
Last updated: January 16, 2008
Last verified: January 2008

January 2, 2007
January 16, 2008
November 2005
December 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Breast milk production and composition [ Time Frame: 1 week ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00418106 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Kangaroo Holding Effects on Breast Milk
Early Kangaroo Holding Effects on Breast Milk Composition

Kangaroo holding is a skin-to-skin method of holding a baby. Many research studies have investigated the maternal and infant benefits associated with kangaroo holding. The purpose of this study is to determine if kangaroo holding a baby changes the amount and composition of breast milk pumped before and after the kangaroo holding session.

Hypotheses:

  1. There is a significant difference in volume of maternal breast milk pumped after kangaroo holding premature infants as compared to maternal breast milk pumped after non-holding conditions
  2. There is a significant difference in the composition of maternal breast milk pumped after kangaroo holding premature infants as compared to maternal breast milk pumped after non-holding condition.

This study will address two of the overwhelming challenges in the physiologic care of premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. The first challenge is promoting neonatal growth through providing a careful balance of nutrition to caloric expenditure for premature infants. The second challenge is supporting parents in the intensive, technology driven environment of the NICU to merge physiologic care with parental-infant interaction through touch, communication, and maternal intervention. The vast majority of mothers with premature infants express breast milk for early feedings, however milk production tends to diminish three to four weeks after delivery. The practice of skin-to-skin holding is thought to promote the mother's ability to produce breast milk, but had not been empirically tested. This study will examine the relationship of kangaroo holding on mother's breast milk production and composition.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample

Mothers of preterm infants

Premature Birth
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1
Mothers who are pumping breast milk and who are willing to kangaroo hold their infant.
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
20
December 2006
December 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Birth weight </= 2000 grams
  • Gestational age 26-34 weeks at birth
  • Medically stable at start of study
  • < 14 days old at start of study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Infants receiving phototherapy
  • Suspected congenital abnormalities
  • Overwhelming sepsis
  • Cardiac Abnormalities
  • Suspected infections
Both
up to 14 Days
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00418106
24211
No
Amy N. Johnson, DNSc, RN, Christiana Hospital
Christiana Care Health Services
University of Delaware
Principal Investigator: Amy N. Johnson, DNSc, RNC Christiana Care Health Services
Christiana Care Health Services
January 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP