Fetal Anatomy by Three-Dimensional Ultrasound

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified January 2014 by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00340002
First received: June 19, 2006
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: January 2014

June 19, 2006
March 14, 2014
November 1997
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00340002 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Fetal Anatomy by Three-Dimensional Ultrasound
Fetal Anatomy by Three-Dimensional Ultrasound

A major goal of perinatal care is to accurately diagnose fetal anomalies prior to birth. This capability allows clinicians to make prudent decisions regarding antepartum care, delivery site, and postnatal therapy. Three-dimensional ultrasound is a recent technology that provides a new way to evaluate the fetus. This technique allows one to scan through a digital ultrasound volume dataset, visualize organs from different perspectives, measure volumes, and render anatomical features through computer processing. However, the accurate characterization of fetal anomalies by this technique must be interpreted in relation to normal fetal anatomy at different stages of pregnancy.

We are continuing to develop an image reference library of fetal anatomy by identifying key diagnostic features by three-dimensional ultrasound. A cross-sectional observational study of up to 1,400 fetuses will catalog a broad spectrum of congenital malformations at various gestational ages. The protocol will include up to 400 examples of normal fetal anatomy by three-dimensional ultrasonography.

All cases will be placed into a digital image database. For each anomaly category, volume reconstructions will be compared to normal anatomy at specific gestational ages. Key diagnostic findings will be documented and correlated with postnatal outcome. We anticipate that our results will permit improved diagnostic interpretation of congenital defects throughout pregnancy.

A major goal of perinatal care is to accurately diagnose fetal anomalies prior to birth. This capability allows clinicians to make prudent decisions regarding antepartum care, delivery site, and postnatal therapy. Three-dimensional ultrasound is a recent technology that provides a new way to evaluate the fetus. This technique allows one to scan through a digital ultrasound volume dataset, visualize organs from different perspectives, measure volumes, and render anatomical features through computer processing. However, the accurate characterization of fetal anomalies by this technique must be interpreted in relation to normal fetal anatomy at different stages of pregnancy.

We are continuing to develop an image reference library of fetal anatomy by identifying key diagnostic features by three-dimensional ultrasound. A cross-sectional observational study of up to 7,000 fetuses will catalog a broad spectrum of congenital malformations at various gestational ages. A subset of the fetuses enrolled in this protocol will also be examined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to identify potential advantages and limitations of this imaging modality when compared to 3DUS for the diagnosis of congenital anomalies. The protocol will include up to 400 examples of normal fetal anatomy by three-dimensional ultrasonography.

All cases will be placed into a digital image database. For each anomaly category, volume data will be acquired at specific gestational ages. Key diagnostic features will be documented and correlated with postnatal outcome. Postnatal correlative studies may include ultrasound, MRI, X-Ray, computerized tomography (CT), and photography. We anticipate that our results will permit improved diagnostic interpretation of congenital defects throughout pregnancy.

Observational
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  • Congenital Anomalies
  • Imaging
  • Prenatal Care
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
7000
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  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

All pregnant subjects will be recruited under informed consent at either Hutzel or William Beaumont Hospitals.

The study population for both arms of this protocol will involve pregnant women greater than or equal to 15 years.

CROSS-SECTIONAL ARM OF PROTOCOL - NORMAL FETUS SUBJECTS:

3DUS STUDIES:

No fetal anomalies suspect by 2DUS.

Excellent visualization of normal fetal anatomy by 2DUS.

Accurate dating criteria by 1st trimester scan and/or menstrual history.

FETAL MRI STUDIES:

Gestational age between 18-42 menstrual weeks.

No known fetal abnormalities.

CROSS-SECTIONAL ARM OF PROTOCOL - ABNORMAL FETUSES:

3DUS STUDIES:

Congenital anomaly suspected by 2DUS.

Accurate dating criteria by 1st trimester scan and/or menstrual history.

FETAL MRI STUDIES:

Gestational age between 18-42 menstrual weeks.

Suspected fetal abnormalities.

POSTMORTEM STUDIES:

Suspected fetal abnormalities by prenatal ultrasound.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

CROSS-SECTIONAL ARM OF PROTOCOL - NORMAL FETUS SUBJECTS:

3DUS STUDIES:

Poor visualization of the fetus due to technical factors (e.g. obesity, surgical scar).

History of noncompliance with prenatal visits with the current or prior pregnancy.

FETAL MRI STUDIES:

Inability of the patient to fit on bore of MRI system.

Metallic implants that would increase risk to patient.

Previous occupational exposure to metal shop.

History of claustrophobia.

CROSS-SECTIONAL ARM OF PROTOCOL - ABNORMAL FETUSES:

3DUS STUDIES:

Poor visualization from technical factors (e.g. obesity or decreased amniotic fluid).

FETAL MRI STUDIES:

Inability of the patient to fit in bore of MRI system.

Metallic implants that would increase risk to patient.

Previous occupational exposure to metal shop.

History of claustrophobia.

POSTMORTEM STUDIES:

Refusal to sign informed consent for postmortem imaging studies.

Female
15 Years and older
Yes
Contact: Roberto Romero, M.D. (313) 993-2700 romeror@mail.nih.gov
United States
 
NCT00340002
999997065, OH97-CH-N065
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Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
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Principal Investigator: Roberto Romero, M.D. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
January 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP