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Controlling Acute or Early HIV Infection With Antiretroviral Drugs, Without a Candidate Vaccine.As Reported Previously, the Candidate Vaccie Was Not Provided by the Maufacturer as Promised

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Fred T. Valentine, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00238459
First received: October 11, 2005
Last updated: November 19, 2013
Last verified: November 2013

October 11, 2005
November 19, 2013
July 2005
March 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Effects of treatment on HIV-specific immune responses. [ Time Frame: Weekly and then monthly after stopping antiretroviral drugs ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Effects of treatment on HIV-specific immune responses
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00238459 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Immune control of HIV after stopping antiretroviral drugs. [ Time Frame: Weekly and then monthly after stopping antirretroviral drugs ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Effect of HIV-specific immune responses on control of HIV
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Controlling Acute or Early HIV Infection With Antiretroviral Drugs, Without a Candidate Vaccine.As Reported Previously, the Candidate Vaccie Was Not Provided by the Maufacturer as Promised
Immunopathogenesis of Acute and Early HIV Infection and the Role of HIV-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses and the Effect of Their Enhancement by Potent Antiretroviral Drugs and an HIV Vaccine Adequate Vaccine Was Not Provided.

The purpose of this study is to determine the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses and immune responses dependent upon these CD4 responses that develop when antiretroviral drugs are started during acute or recent HIV infection, whether these CD4 responses can be enhanced with a therapeutic HIV vaccine (HIV-1 immunogen), and what pattern of HIV-specific immune responses is associated with control of HIV upon discontinuation of antiretroviral drugs during an analytical therapeutic interruption. Participants will be treatment-naive adults with acute or early HIV infection who will choose to start or not start anti-HIV drugs at the beginning of the study. NOTE: In August 2007 we were notified by the manufacturer of the candidate vaccine that they were no longer making the vaccine, and that the vaccine would no longer be available. Unfortunately too few participants have received either the vaccine or placebo to conclude anything about efficacy. No safety problems occurred.

In some HIV patients with acute or early infection, effective long-term immunological control of HIV occurs, indicating that before HIV caused irreparable damage, their immune systems were able to mount an effective immune response to HIV. However, it is unknown how the immune systems of such patients with acute or early infection are able to develop and maintain effective memory CD4 immune responses. In other HIV patients, it is the destruction of CD4 cells and an ever-weakening immune system that leads to the progression of HIV disease. HIV-1 immunogen is a whole killed gp120-depleted HIV vaccine composed of an HIV-1 isolate (HZ321) from serum collected from a patient in Zaire in 1976. The vaccine contains proteins from HIV subtypes A and G. By injecting these particles into HIV infected people, the immune system may be stimulated to mount a greater immune response not only to the killed HIV particles of the vaccine but also to real virus particles and HIV infected cells in these people. Also, because HIV-1 immunogen is based on whole inactivated virus, it may stimulate broader immune responses that are capable of suppressing more diverse HIV strains than currently available vaccine preparations that are based on single subunit proteins of HIV. This study was planned to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a therapeutic HIV vaccine, HIV-1 immunogen, in conjunction with STIs, in controlling HIV infection during acute or early infection. Participants will be antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive and will choose to either start or not start ART in this study.

Participants will elect to start or not start ART at the start of this study. Those participants who choose not to begin ART will not receive any intervention during this study but will be followed for the entire length of the study. Those participants that choose to begin ART will start taking study-approved ART in Step 1 of the study. Only patients who have a viral load of less than 50 copies/ml by Week 24 will proceed to Step 2; all other patients who begin ART will continue on study-approved ART but will not receive any vaccinations over the course of the study. Step 2 is the STI part of the study. In Step 2, patients will stop ART and will be randomly assigned to receive therapeutic vaccine or placebo injections at three timepoints: at the start of Step 2 and 12 and 24 weeks after starting Step 2. Injections will be given only to patients who have been on ART for at least 48 weeks; patients will receive their assigned injections 36 weeks after their first viral load reading of less than 50 copies/ml. A patient will enter Step 3 after having restarted ART for a minimum of 8 weeks after Step 2 ends, when the patient's viral load is less than 400 copies/ml and CD4 count is greater than 250 cells/ml. Entry into Step 4, which will include additional retreatment and revaccination, may be necessary for some participants, depending on individual immune response to the study-given ART and the injections.

The ART participants in this study will receive either study-provided ART or another approved ART; however, only study-provided ART will be provided by the study. Viral load and CD4 count will be closely monitored and will guide retreatment and revaccination as necessary. Blood collection will occur at all visits. A physical exam will occur at most visits. Urine collection and quality of life and adherence questionnaires will occur at selected visits.

NOTE: In August 2007 we were notified by the manufacturer of the candidate vaccine that they were no longer making the vaccine, and that the vaccine would no longer be available. Unfortunately too few participants have received either the vaccine or placebo to conclude anything about efficacy. No safety problems occurred.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Description:

Sequential samples from patients with acute and recent HIV infection

Non-Probability Sample

Acutely HIV infected patients: virus positive antibody negative Recently HIV infected patients: virus positive, low titers of antibody

HIV Infections
  • Drug: Patients elected to take licensed drugs. The vaccine was not provided for evaluation
    Note:In August 2007 we were notified by the manufacturer that the experimental vaccine was no longer being made and would no longer be available for this study. Too few participants have received the vaccine or placebo to conclude anything about potential efficacy
  • Drug: multiple licensed drugs not randomized
  • Drug: multiple licensed antiretroviral drugs; not randomized
  • Other: Intended vaccine not provided, Licensed drugs provided, but were not investigated
  • Recently infected patients
    Cohort 1)Patients elcted to be immediately treated with licensed drugs:21 patients Cohort 2) Or to delay treatment until clinically indicated:16 patieints
    Intervention: Drug: multiple licensed drugs not randomized
  • A vaccine,HIV-1 immunogen was not provided for evaluation
    In the intial design, acandiate HIV vaccine was to be evaluated, but in August 2007 the manufacturer refused to provide vaccine to allow this study to evaluate the effect of a vaccine on control of HIV. Therefore the study became an observational study of the effects of early versus delayed initiation of antiretrovral therapy on the preservation of anti-HIV immune responses and the ability of patients to control virus after a closely monitored discontinuation of therapy.
    Interventions:
    • Drug: Patients elected to take licensed drugs. The vaccine was not provided for evaluation
    • Drug: multiple licensed antiretroviral drugs; not randomized
    • Other: Intended vaccine not provided, Licensed drugs provided, but were not investigated

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
58
October 2013
March 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Acute or early HIV infection
  • ART naive
  • Willing to use acceptable forms of contraception

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Allergy/sensitivity to any components of the vaccine
  • Currently involuntarily incarcerated
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding
Both
18 Years to 65 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States,   Canada
 
NCT00238459
5P01AI57127-2, 5P01 AI57127
Yes
Fred T. Valentine, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Fred Valentine, MD New York University School of Medicine
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
November 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP