Impact of Moderate Alcohol Use on Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Progression

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00205075
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: September 22, 2008
Last verified: September 2008

September 13, 2005
September 22, 2008
August 2004
June 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00205075 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Impact of Moderate Alcohol Use on Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Progression
The Use of Validated Measures of Alcohol Intake to Measure the Impact of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Hepatic Fibrogenesis in Individuals Infected With Hepatitis C

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of moderate alcohol intake on liver disease caused by HCV in terms of speed of progression as compared to those not drinking alcohol.

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Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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  • Hepatic Fibrogenesis
  • Hepatitis C
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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June 2008
June 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Outpatient with HCV who is not receiving or planning treatment but is receiving standard of care monitoring every 3 months and is either abstinent from alcohol or drinking only moderately

Exclusion Criteria:

  • HIV co-infection
  • Treated within the past 6 months
  • History (hx) of other liver disease
  • Alcohol use greater than 30 g/day or history of binge drinking in the last year
  • Decompensated liver disease
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00205075
M-2004-0161
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University of Wisconsin, Madison
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Principal Investigator: Adnan Said, MD University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
September 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP