Changes in Food Reinforcement During Obesity Treatment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
The Miriam Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00200291
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: April 19, 2012
Last verified: December 2007

September 12, 2005
April 19, 2012
July 2004
October 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Reinforcing value of low- and high-fat food [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Reinforcing value of low- and high-fat food
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00200291 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
diet changes and weight loss [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
diet changes and weight loss
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Changes in Food Reinforcement During Obesity Treatment
Changes in Food Reinforcement During Obesity Treatment

The reinforcing value of food, or how much a person "wants" a food, is an important determinant of food intake. Thus far, food reinforcement has only been studied in laboratory settings, and no studies have examined whether the reinforcing value of food is altered when dietary changes are made. The chronic deprivation that occurs when a low-calorie, low-fat diet is implemented for weight loss may increase the reinforcing value of all foods, but particularly for restricted high-fat foods. Greater increases in the reinforcing value of high-fat foods relative to low-fat foods may be detrimental for sustaining newly adopted eating behaviors that produce weight loss, whereas greater increases in the reinforcing value of low-fat foods relative to high-fat foods may aid in maintaining healthy eating behaviors. The aim of this application is to measure food reinforcement in a clinical setting to determine if food reinforcement changes when a traditional weight loss diet is prescribed. For this ancillary study, 147 volunteers will be recruited from the 165 overweight and obese women participating in the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise (PRIDE) at The Miriam Hospital. As part of PRIDE, these participants will be randomized in a 2-to-1 ratio to either a 6-month weight loss intervention or usual care. Assessments of food reinforcement, dietary intake, and weight will occur at 0 and 6 months. Given that the intervention group changes their diet relative to the usual care group, it is hypothesized: 1) the intervention group will have greater increases in the reinforcing value of both high- and low-fat foods than the usual care group from 0 to 6 months; and 2) within the intervention group, decreases in frequency of consumption of high-fat foods will be related to increases in the reinforcing value of high-fat foods from 0 to 6 months. These results will lead to a novel line of research, examining the relationship between food reinforcement and weight loss maintenance, so that diets can be designed to promote changes in food reinforcement that aid in sustaining dietary changes and weight loss.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Obesity
Behavioral: hypocaloric, low-fat diet
hypocaloric, low-fat diet
  • Experimental: 1
    Behavioral: hypocaloric low-fat diet
    Intervention: Behavioral: hypocaloric, low-fat diet
  • Placebo Comparator: 2
    Behavioral: hypocaloric, low-fat diet
    Intervention: Behavioral: hypocaloric, low-fat diet
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
147
October 2007
October 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants from main parent study - PRIDE

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Allergic to foods in investigation
Female
21 Years to 70 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00200291
3 U01 DK067861-02S1
Not Provided
The Miriam Hospital
The Miriam Hospital
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Principal Investigator: Hollie A Raynor, PhD University of Tennessee
The Miriam Hospital
December 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP