Protecting the 'Hood Against Tobacco

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Tobacco Related Disease Research Program
Information provided by:
University of California, San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00187603
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: May 5, 2008
Last verified: August 2005

September 13, 2005
May 5, 2008
July 2003
February 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Smoking cessation (cotinine validation) [ Time Frame: at 6 and 12 months ]
Smoking cessation at 6 and 12 months (cotinine validation)
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00187603 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Qualitative interviews
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Protecting the 'Hood Against Tobacco
Protecting the 'Hood Against Tobacco: Cessation Project

Among all racial/ethnic groups, African Americans have the greatest risk of becoming ill or dying from tobacco-related diseases. Because of this disproportionate disease burden, it is particularly urgent that researchers focusing on tobacco control partner with African American communities. Intervention strategies which hold the tobacco industry accountable for its behavior are effective in changing views of tobacco use. In earlier work, the investigators found that information from internal tobacco industry documents, when shown to African American smokers, stimulated reflection about quitting and interest in disseminating information about industry targeting behaviors to others. However, to date there have been no attempts to utilize the information in industry documents as part of a smoking cessation intervention. In this project, the investigators will test whether a community co-developed, tailored quit-smoking program featuring exposures to African American-specific tobacco industry documents and media exercises in addition to proven individual quitting strategies can increase the number of people who quit smoking at six months and one year, as compared with usual care.

The specific aims of the project are to:

  1. test, using statistics, how well an innovative community-based, culturally tailored quit-smoking program for African Americans works at 6 and 12 months;
  2. test selected variables for how well they predict who will return to smoking;
  3. use interviews to identify additional individual and/or community factors associated with successful quitting or relapse; and
  4. collect information to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the CARA project collaborative efforts in developing and sustaining the project over time, enhancing community awareness of tobacco issues, and creation or enhancement of community tobacco control resources.

Among all racial/ethnic groups, African Americans have the greatest risk of becoming ill or dying from tobacco-related diseases. Because of this disproportionate disease burden, it is particularly urgent that researchers focusing on tobacco control partner with African American communities. Intervention strategies which hold the tobacco industry accountable for its behavior are effective in changing views of tobacco use. In earlier work, we found that information from internal tobacco industry documents, when shown to African American smokers, stimulated reflection about quitting and interest in disseminating information about industry targeting behaviors to others. However, to date there have been no attempts to utilize the information in industry documents as part of a smoking cessation intervention. In this project, we will test whether a community co-developed, tailored quit-smoking program featuring exposures to African American-specific tobacco industry documents and media exercises in addition to proven individual quitting strategies can increase the number of people who quit smoking at six months and one year, as compared with usual care.

The specific aims of the project are to:

  1. test, using statistics, how well an innovative community-based, culturally tailored quit-smoking program for African Americans works at 6 and 12 months;
  2. test selected variables for how well they predict who will return to smoking;
  3. use interviews to identify additional individual and/or community factors associated with successful quitting or relapse; and
  4. collect information to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the CARA project collaborative efforts in developing and sustaining the project over time, enhancing community awareness of tobacco issues, and creation or enhancement of community tobacco control resources.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Smoking
Behavioral: tobacco cessation program
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
270
June 2007
February 2007   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • African American adults who have used tobacco in the last month

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to read or speak English
  • Dependence on other substances (except for marijuana)
  • Disabling health conditions that would prevent participation
Both
21 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00187603
12AT-1700
Not Provided
Ruth Malone, Professor, University of California, San Francisco
University of California, San Francisco
Tobacco Related Disease Research Program
Principal Investigator: Ruth E Malone, RN, PhD Associate Professor UCSF
University of California, San Francisco
August 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP