Effects of Advertising on Young Children's Perception of Taste

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Information provided by:
Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00185536
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: NA
Last verified: September 2005
History: No changes posted

September 12, 2005
September 12, 2005
April 2002
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No Changes Posted
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Effects of Advertising on Young Children's Perception of Taste
Effects of Advertising on Young Children's Perception of Taste

To test whether young children’s actual taste preferences are influenced by the natural marketing environment in which they live. To do so, we tested whether preschool children would like the taste of a food more if they thought it was from a heavily marketed source. We asked preschool children to taste identical foods in packaging from this heavily marketed source and plain packaging, and to tell us if they tasted the same or if one tasted better. We hypothesized that, even among a sample of 3-5 year olds participating in Head Start, a federally-sponsored preschool program for low-income families, young children would prefer the taste of foods perceived to be from the heavily marketed source.

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Observational
Observational Model: Defined Population
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
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Obesity
Behavioral: Packaging and identification of source
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Robinson TN, Borzekowski DL, Matheson DM, Kraemer HC. Effects of fast food branding on young children's taste preferences. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Aug;161(8):792-7.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
100
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • enrolled at participating head start sites

Exclusion Criteria:

  • unable to complete the study procedures
Both
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Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00185536
80618, 20664
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Stanford University
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Principal Investigator: Thomas N. Robinson, MD, MPH Stanford University
Stanford University
September 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP