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Does Routine Screening for Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Health Care Settings do More Good Than Harm?

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Echo: Improving Women's Health in Ontario (formerly Ontario Women's Health Council)
Information provided by:
McMaster University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00182468
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: September 8, 2009
Last verified: September 2009

September 13, 2005
September 8, 2009
April 2005
July 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Recurrence of intimate partner violence [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Health-specific quality of life [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Harms of screening and/or usual care [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Recurrence of intimate partner violence
  • Health-specific quality of life
  • Harms of screening and/or usual care
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00182468 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Mental health (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], anxiety, somatic complaints, substance use) [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Global physical and emotional health and well-being [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Health services utilization [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Safety behaviours [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Use of information and resources [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Child quality of life [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Stage in process of identifying and resolving abuse [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Exposure to maltreatment as a child [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
  • Mental health (depression, PTSD, anxiety, somatic complaints, substance use)
  • Global physical and emotional health and well-being
  • Health services utilization
  • Safety behaviours
  • Use of information and resources
  • Child quality of life
  • Stage in process of identifying & resolving abuse
  • Exposure to maltreatment as a child
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Does Routine Screening for Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Health Care Settings do More Good Than Harm?
If, When and How to Ask the Question(s): Assessing Screening Approaches to Identifying Woman Abuse in Health Care Settings

The purpose of the research is to evaluate whether routine screening for woman abuse in health care settings, as compared to no screening, does more good than harm. Recent reviews have identified the need for high quality research to understand 1) the actual impact on all women of instituting mass screening procedures to identify woman abuse and 2) the extent to which early identification through screening is effective in preventing or ameliorating important outcomes. The main outcomes for the study are reduction in violence, improvement in life quality, and potential harms of screening. A number of secondary outcomes to help understand the process by which screening and usual care might lead to changes in the primary outcomes will also be assessed.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Screening
Intimate Partner Violence Against Women
Other: Screening for intimate partner violence
Women are screened for intimate partner violence prior to seeing a health care provider.
  • Experimental: 1
    Women are screened for intimate partner violence prior to seeing a health care provider.
    Intervention: Other: Screening for intimate partner violence
  • No Intervention: 2
    Women see their health care provider without being asked about intimate partner violence.
MacMillan HL, Wathen CN, Jamieson E, Boyle MH, Shannon HS, Ford-Gilboe M, Worster A, Lent B, Coben JH, Campbell JC, McNutt LA; McMaster Violence Against Women Research Group. Screening for intimate partner violence in health care settings: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2009 Aug 5;302(5):493-501.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
5681
July 2008
July 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Women aged 18-64 years
  • Patients at the health care site
  • Able to participate in English
  • Able to separate from accompanying person(s)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Too ill to participate
  • Unable to separate from accompanying person(s)
  • Unable to speak, read, or write English
Female
18 Years to 64 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT00182468
MacMillan_VAW_RCT
Yes
Dr. Harriet L. MacMillan, McMaster University
McMaster University
Echo: Improving Women's Health in Ontario (formerly Ontario Women's Health Council)
Principal Investigator: Harriet L MacMillan, MD, MSc McMaster University
McMaster University
September 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP