A Stitch in Time May Save Lives: Turning Poor Bednets Into Good Ones

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of Durham
Medical Research Council Unit, The Gambia
Information provided by:
Gates Malaria Partnership
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00169117
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: February 7, 2008
Last verified: February 2008

September 13, 2005
February 7, 2008
June 2002
December 2002   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Number of bednets repaired (pre- vs post intervention) [ Time Frame: November 2003 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Mean proportion of holes repaired/net (pre- vs post intervention) [ Time Frame: November 2003 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Reduction in mosquitoes with a good net compared with a poor one (pre-intervention survey). [ Time Frame: November 2003 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Reduction in mosquitoes with a good net compared with a repaired net (post-intervention survey) [ Time Frame: November 2003 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Number of bednets repaired (pre- vs post intervention)
  • Mean proportion of holes repaired/net (pre- vs post intervention)
  • Reduction in mosquitoes with a good net compared with a poor one (pre-intervention survey).
  • Reduction in mosquitoes with a good net compared with a repaired net (post-intervention survey)
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00169117 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Community acceptability [ Time Frame: November 2003 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Community acceptability
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
A Stitch in Time May Save Lives: Turning Poor Bednets Into Good Ones
A Stitch in Time May Save Lives: Turning Poor Bednets Into Good Ones

Although the use of mosquito nets has increased in Africa, many of the nets used are in a poor state, and not an effective barrier against mosquitoes. This pilot study examines whether subsistence farmers in rural Africa can be encouraged to repair their mosquito nets and use their bednets appropriately. Attitudes and practises on sewing and net use were examined in The Gambia and an intervention developed to promote net repair. Songs and posters were used to emphasise the importance of repairing nets and their correct use, and served as aural and visual reminders to repair nets now rather than postpone this household chore. The intervention was aimed at effectively and cheaply turning a poor net into a good one.

Sleeping under an insecticide-treated net protects the sleeper from mosquito bites and is highly effective means of reducing the risk of malaria. Recent studies in The Gambia and Kenya have shown that untreated bednets in good condition can also protect against malaria (51% protection against parasitaemia, 95% CIs 34-64%). However, most children in rural Gambia sleep under untreated nets in poor condition, often with a few holes, and do not close their nets properly at night. These children remain exposed to mosquito bites and the risk of malaria.

This pilot study examines whether subsistence farmers in rural Africa can be encouraged to repair their mosquito nets and use their bednets appropriately. Attitudes and practises on sewing and net use were examined in rural Gambia and an intervention developed to promote net repair. Songs and posters were used to emphasise the importance of repairing nets and their correct use, and served as aural and visual reminders to repair nets now rather than postpone this household chore. The intervention was aimed at effectively and cheaply turning a poor net into a good one.

The intervention was developed and implemented in two neighbouring villages in The Gambia, with each village composing their own songs. There was no formal control village. An internal comparison group was used in which the nets of responders and non-responders living within the same village were compared.The success of the intervention was assessed by: recording the number of nets repaired and used correctly for malarial prevention before and after the intervention; by counts of mosquitoes entering the nets classified according to number of holes and degree of repair; as well as by canvassing participants' opinions.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Malaria
Behavioral: Songs/posters aimed at behaviour change
This was a behavioural intervention, using songs and posters composed/designed by community members which aimed at behaviour change to increase repair and maintenance of mosquito nets
Experimental: 1
Behavioural intervention: Songs/posters aimed at behaviour change to increase repair and maintenance of mosquito nets
Intervention: Behavioral: Songs/posters aimed at behaviour change

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
772
December 2002
December 2002   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Community consent
  • Willingness to participate in study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Gambia
 
NCT00169117
DIF8
No
Not Provided
Gates Malaria Partnership
  • University of Durham
  • Medical Research Council Unit, The Gambia
Principal Investigator: Steven W Lindsay, PhD University of Durham
Principal Investigator: Sian E Clarke, PhD London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, UK
Principal Investigator: Catherine Panter-Brick, PhD University of Durham
Gates Malaria Partnership
February 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP