Th1, Th2 and Monokine Responses as Risk Factors of Renal Transplant Rejection

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Heidelberg University
Astellas Pharma Inc
Novartis
Fresenius AG
Hoffmann-La Roche
Biotest
Information provided by:
University of Giessen
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00150891
First received: September 6, 2005
Last updated: May 8, 2007
Last verified: May 2007

September 6, 2005
May 8, 2007
January 1998
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00150891 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Th1, Th2 and Monokine Responses as Risk Factors of Renal Transplant Rejection
Role of Th1, Th2 and Monokine Responses as Risk Factors of Acute and Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection – Impact of Different Immunosuppressive Protocols

Chronic transplant rejection remains the main cause of late kidney graft loss. We showed previously that patients with pretransplant CD4 helper defects and low in-vitro IL-10 responses demonstrated an extremely low risk of acute rejection and a significantly better 1- and 3-year graft function whereas pretransplant Th1 responses were not predictive (Weimer R et al. 1996 and 1998). In liver transplant recipients, we found CD4 helper function and in-vitro IL-10 responses significantly decreased compared to CsA-treated patients (Zipperle et al. 1997). If the same effect will be demonstrated in renal transplant recipients, Tacrolimus (Tacr) treatment might result in enhanced graft survival compared to CsA, when CD4 helper function and in-vitro IL-10 responses of the individual patient are elevated. Other studies of our group suggest a beneficial role of enhanced T-suppressor activity and of an IL-6 independent B cell/monocyte defect in the maintenance of long-term stable graft function, whereas enhanced monokine secretion (TNF-a, GM-CSF, IL-6) was found in chronic rejection (Weimer et al. 1990, 1992, 1994, 1998).

In the current randomized prospective study we will analyze the impact of CsA versus Tacr and of MMF versus azathioprine on Th1, Th2 and monokine responses and their predictive value regarding occurrence of acute and chronic rejection. With a proposed follow-up of 5 years this study might enable a patient-tailored immunosuppressive therapy resulting in prolonged graft survival.

Chronic transplant rejection remains the main cause of late kidney graft loss. We showed previously that patients with pretransplant CD4 helper defects and low in-vitro IL-10 responses demonstrated an extremely low risk of acute rejection and a significantly better 1- and 3-year graft function whereas pretransplant Th1 responses were not predictive (Weimer R et al. 1996 and 1998). In liver transplant recipients, we found CD4 helper function and in-vitro IL-10 responses significantly decreased compared to CsA-treated patients (Zipperle et al. 1997). If the same effect will be demonstrated in renal transplant recipients, Tacrolimus (Tacr) treatment might result in enhanced graft survival compared to CsA, when CD4 helper function and in-vitro IL-10 responses of the individual patient are elevated. Other studies of our group suggest a beneficial role of enhanced T-suppressor activity and of an IL-6 independent B cell/monocyte defect in the maintenance of long-term stable graft function, whereas enhanced monokine secretion (TNF-a, GM-CSF, IL-6) was found in chronic rejection (Weimer et al. 1990, 1992, 1994, 1998).

In the current randomized prospective study we will analyze the impact of CsA versus Tacr and of MMF versus azathioprine (Aza; 3 treatment groups: CsA/Aza, CsA/MMF and Tacr/Aza; steroid and prophylactic ATG treatment according to the Giessen protocol) on immune parameters and their predictive value regarding occurrence of acute and chronic rejection. As immune parameters we will assess CD4 helper function, in-vitro IL-4 and IL-10 responses of T cells and CD4+ T cells, respectively, in allogeneic cocultures of patient T cells with control B cells and in PHA-stimulated T cell cultures, T-cell dependent (PWM-stimulated allogeneic cocultures) and T-independent (SAC I-stimulated B cell cultures) immunoglobulin-secreting cell (ISC) responses, B-cell IL-6 and IL-10 responses and monokine responses (LPS-stimulated monocyte cultures) pretransplant, and 4 months, 1 year, 2 years and 5 years posttransplant. Serum cytokines and easily measurable parameters as neopterin, sIL-1RA and sCD30 will be assessed at the same time points. The same is true for flow cytometric analysis of cytokine receptor, adhesion molecule, costimulator molecule and surface molecule expression, respectively, which play an important role in cell-cell interactions and tolerance induction. Cytokine promoter gene polymorphisms will be determined to potentially enable pretransplant risk estimation. To establish a broadly available and rapid diagnostic method, we will compare the data of intracellular cytokine testing with the results of the much more difficult and time consuming coculture analyses used in our previous studies.

With a proposed follow-up of 5 years this prospective randomized study might enable a patient-tailored immunosuppressive therapy resulting in better graft function and prolonged graft survival by preventing chronic allograft rejection.

Weimer R, Pomer S, Staehler G, Opelz G. Increased T suppressor activity in renal transplant recipients with long-term stable graft function. Clinical Transplantation 1990; 4: 280-286

Weimer R, Zipperle S, Daniel V, Pomer S, Staehler G, Opelz G. In vitro B cell response in long-term renal transplant recipients. Transplant Proc 1992; 24(6): 2537-2538

Weimer R, Zipperle S, Daniel V, Pomer S, Staehler G, Opelz G. IL-6 independent monocyte/B cell defect in renal transplant recipients with long-term stable graft function. Transplantation 1994; 57(1): 54-59

Weimer R, Zipperle S, Daniel V, Carl S, Staehler G, Opelz G. Pretransplant CD4 helper function and IL-10 response predict risk of acute kidney graft rejection. Transplantation 1996; 62(11): 1606-1614

Zipperle S, Weimer R, Golling M, Daniel V, Otto G, Opelz G. Impaired T cell IL-10 secretion and CD4 helper function in liver transplant patients treated with tacrolimus. Transplant Proc 1997; 29(1-2): 1079-1080

Weimer R, Zipperle S, Daniel V, Carl S, Staehler G, Opelz G. Superior 3-year kidney graft function in patients with impaired pretransplant Th2 responses. Transplant Int 1998; 11 (Suppl 1): 350-356

Observational
Observational Model: Defined Population
Primary Purpose: Screening
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
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Renal Failure, Chronic
  • Procedure: Kidney transplantation
  • Drug: cyclosporine A
  • Drug: tacrolimus
  • Drug: azathioprine
  • Drug: mycophenolate mofetil
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
84
January 2006
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • Renal transplant recipients in the Giessen renal transplant unit

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Contraindications against blood-taking (anemia with hemoglobin<9.5 g/l, hypotension etc.)
  • No informed consent by the patient
Both
14 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Germany
 
NCT00150891
NTx-prosp-001
No
Not Provided
University of Giessen
  • Heidelberg University
  • Astellas Pharma Inc
  • Novartis
  • Fresenius AG
  • Hoffmann-La Roche
  • Biotest
Principal Investigator: Rolf Weimer, Prof. Dr. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Giessen, Germany
University of Giessen
May 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP