Enhancing Support for Women at Risk for Heart Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00142701
First received: September 1, 2005
Last updated: NA
Last verified: August 2005
History: No changes posted

September 1, 2005
September 1, 2005
April 1999
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No Changes Posted
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Enhancing Support for Women at Risk for Heart Disease
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To test a practical, theory-based intervention to achieve long-term behavior change for postmenopausal women with Type 2 diabetes at high risk for developing coronary heart disease (CHD).

BACKGROUND:

The overall goal of this study was to test a practical, theory-based intervention to achieve long-term behavior change for women with Type 2 diabetes at high risk for developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that diabetes is associated with increased risk for CHD that is greater in women than in men. CHD is a major cause of death and functional limitations in women, but the vast majority of CHD studies have primarily involved middle-aged men. There is convincing research evidence that healthy lifestyle behaviors, including low-fat diet, physical activity, stress management, smoking cessation, and social support, can reduce CHD risk

The study was initiated in response to a Request for Applications released in October 1997 by the National Institutes of Health Office of the Director on "Innovative Approaches to Disease Prevention Through Behavior Change."

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study was a randomized trial to compare short-term (6-month) outcomes in women receiving usual care compared to a modified Ornish-type comprehensive lifestyle management (CLM) intervention. Participants (N = 279) were randomized to usual care (UC) or Mediterranean Lifestyle Program, a lifestyle change intervention aimed at the behavioral risk factors (eating patterns, physical activity, stress management, and social support) affecting risk for CHD in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. After 6 months, women in the CLM condition were randomized to one of two approaches for providing support either lay-led group support or personalized computer-based support - to evaluate these strategies in enhancing longer-term maintenance of effects. Outcomes included multiple CHD lifestyle behaviors (e.g., dietary intake, exercise levels, stress management, smoking cessation), physiological risk factors associated with CHD (e.g., serum lipids, hypertension, weight, vascular reactivity), HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin, a measure of diabetes), and quality of life (e.g., depression, functioning).

Interventional
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Allocation: Randomized
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Heart Diseases
  • Coronary Disease
  • Coronary Heart Disease Risk Reduction
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Non-Insulin Dependent
  • Behavioral: diet
  • Behavioral: physical activity
  • Behavioral: stress management
  • Behavioral: smoking cessation
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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March 2005
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No eligibility criteria

Female
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00142701
251
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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Investigator: Deborah Toobert Oregon Research Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
August 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP