Aortic Calcium: Epidemiology and Progression -- Ancillary to MESA

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Michael H. Criqui, University of California, San Diego
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00059124
First received: April 17, 2003
Last updated: July 10, 2013
Last verified: July 2013

April 17, 2003
July 10, 2013
March 2003
February 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Abdominal Aortic Calcium [ Time Frame: During the Exam 2 and Exam 3 MESA visits ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00059124 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Aortic Calcium: Epidemiology and Progression -- Ancillary to MESA
Aortic Calcium: Epidemiology and Progression

To study the epidemiology of aortic calcium.

BACKGROUND:

Aortic calcium measured by computed tomography occurs earlier in life than other subclinical (that is, asymptomatic) markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD), shows a wide range, and is common in women. The large size of the aorta and relative lack of image artifact from motion make it ideal for radiographic quantitative imaging. This study is ancillary to and coordinated with the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a large prospective epidemiologic study investigating multiple subclinical CVD measures and CVD risk factors. Subclinical measures in MESA include coronary calcium, carotid ultrasound, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and the ankle/brachial blood pressure index. The extensive CVD risk factor measurements include both traditional risk factors and newer measures such as inflammatory and genetic markers.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

This ancillary study will determine the epidemiology of aortic calcium in 2000 randomly selected (from 6500 total) MESA participants. Questions to be addressed include predictors of aortic calcium progression; associations of aortic calcium and aortic calcium progression with other subclinical CVD measures, CVD risk factors, and demographics; and the prognostic significance of aortic calcium. The project has three primary specific aims: 1) to predict the cross-sectional aortic calcium burden as a function of other subclinical CVD measures and CVD risk factors; 2) to predict aortic calcium progression as a function of other subclinical CVD measures and CVD risk factors, and 3) to predict aortic calcium progression as a function of progression of selected subclinical CVD measures and CVD risk factors. The two secondary specific aims are 1) to contrast the results of the three primary specific aims for men vs. women, and for four major ethnic groups (White, Hispanic, Black, and Asian); and 2) to provide a database for future evaluation of whether aortic calcium and/or aortic calcium progression independently predict subsequent myocardial infarction, stroke, and other CVD events.

Observational
Observational Model: Ecologic or Community
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

A random selection of approximately 1/3 of the original MESA participants.

  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Heart Diseases
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Coronary Arteriosclerosis
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
1980
February 2008
February 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Participation in the original MESA Study

Both
45 Years to 84 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
NCT00059124
1213, R01HL072403
No
Dr. Michael H. Criqui, University of California, San Diego
University of California, San Diego
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Principal Investigator: Michael H Criqui, MD, MPH University of California, San Diego
University of California, San Diego
July 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP