Treatment of Acute HIV Infection to Preserve Immune Function

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00055094
First received: February 19, 2003
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: April 2004

February 19, 2003
June 23, 2005
July 1999
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00055094 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Treatment of Acute HIV Infection to Preserve Immune Function
Immune Control of HIV Replication

While most people with HIV experience significant destruction of their immune systems, some people appear to have preserved immune function and can control the virus without drugs. Early treatment with anti-HIV drugs may help preserve the immune system, allowing it to control the virus once the drugs are stopped. This study will evaluate the immune system response of HIV infected people who are treated with anti-HIV drugs soon after being infected.

Studies have identified a potent CD4 T helper (Th) cell response in some infected people, and have shown a correlation between virus-specific Th cells and low levels of viremia. Early institution of potent antiviral therapy in the earliest stages of acute HIV infection have led to strong Th cell responses, analogous to those seen in people who are able to control viremia in the absence of antiviral therapy. This may be because potent antiviral therapy is able to protect virus-specific Th cells as they become activated, and thus these cells are not lost in the earliest stages of infection. This study will characterize the immune response of patients with acute HIV infection who receive antiretroviral therapy and will determine the effects of interruption of therapy in those people who have immune responses to HIV that are similar to patients with long-term non-progressing infection.

Participants in this study will be followed through June 2004. Study visits vary from only once to every month and are scheduled at the discretion of the study officials. Study visits include an interview and blood tests.

Observational
Observational Model: Defined Population
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
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HIV Infections
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
500
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Inclusion Criteria

  • Acute HIV infection
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00055094
1R01AI44656-01, 5R01AI044656-04
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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
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Principal Investigator: Bruce Walker, MD Massachusetts General Hospital
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
April 2004

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP