Dichloroacetate Kinetics, Metabolism and Toxicology

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00015015
First received: April 17, 2001
Last updated: September 1, 2006
Last verified: September 2006

April 17, 2001
September 1, 2006
December 1994
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00015015 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Dichloroacetate Kinetics, Metabolism and Toxicology
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Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a product of water chlorination and a metabolite of certain industrial solvents, thus making it a chemical of environmental concern. However, DCA is also used as an investigational drug for treating various diseases of adults and children, at doses far greater than those to which humans are normally exposed in the environment. Our research involves how DCA is metabolized by healthy adults and by children with a fatal genetic disease, congenital lactic acidosis (CLA) who are treated with DCA.

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Observational
Observational Model: Defined Population
Primary Purpose: Screening
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
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Lactic Acidosis
Drug: Dichloroacetate
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
100
October 2002
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Children with congenital lactic acidosis Healthy adult volunteers

Both
3 Months to 65 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00015015
7355-CP-001
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National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
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National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
September 2006

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP