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Matching, Outcomes and Costs in Substance Abuse/Psychiatric Treatment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00012727
First received: March 14, 2001
Last updated: April 16, 2014
Last verified: April 2014

March 14, 2001
April 16, 2014
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00012727 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Matching, Outcomes and Costs in Substance Abuse/Psychiatric Treatment
Matching, Outcomes and Costs in Substance Abuse/Psychiatric Treatment

This project�s goal is to improve the quality of care and reduce treatment costs for veterans with substance abuse and psychiatric problems.

Background:

This project�s goal is to improve the quality of care and reduce treatment costs for veterans with substance abuse and psychiatric problems.

Objectives:

This project is evaluating a patient-treatment matching strategy to improve residential treatment for substance abuse patients with psychiatric disorders. Its immediate objective is to examine whether the matching strategy results in more effective and cost-effective treatment in VA programs. We hypothesize that patients with severe clinical problems will have better outcomes when they are matched to service-intensive programs; patients with moderate problems will have better outcomes when they are matched to programs having a lower intensity of services. For both patient groups, community treatment should prove to be more cost-effective than hospital treatment.

Methods:

The project utilized a stratified randomized design. We paired each of three VA hospital programs that treat dual diagnosis patients and are high on intensity with a nearby high-intensity community residential facility (CRF) that contracts with the VA. We also paired four VA hospital and four CRFs that are low on intensity. Veterans who applied for substance abuse treatment at VA facilities were randomly assigned to either the VA hospital or CRF. Patient assessments have been conducted at intake (N=230), discharge, and a 4-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are patients� severity of substance abuse and psychiatric problems. Secondary outcomes are patients� functional status and their VA and non-VA health care utilization and its costs.

Status:

Completed.

Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Dual Diagnosis
Procedure: Matching Symptom Severity to Service Intensity
Arm 1
Intervention: Procedure: Matching Symptom Severity to Service Intensity

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
236
August 2001
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Inclusion Criteria:

Patients must be entering a VA inpatient substance abuse or psychiatric treatment program and be clinically judged as appropriate for inpatient or community residential care.

Exclusion Criteria:

Both
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00012727
IIR 95-011
No
Department of Veterans Affairs
Department of Veterans Affairs
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Christine Timko, PhD VA Palo Alto Health Care System
Department of Veterans Affairs
April 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP