Trends in Trans-Fatty Acid Intake Between 1980 and 1997

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00006500
First received: November 16, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: April 2004

November 16, 2000
June 23, 2005
April 2000
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00006500 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Trends in Trans-Fatty Acid Intake Between 1980 and 1997
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To examine trends in trans-fatty acid intake by using newly available nutrient data to recalculate 24 dietary recalls from the Minnesota Heart Survey.

BACKGROUND:

In recent years concern has arisen about the potential health hazards of trans-fatty acids in the American diet. Dietary intake of trans-fatty acids has been linked to unhealthy shifts in serum lipid profiles and to coronary heart disease (CHD) in a number of studies. Although several studies have estimated intakes of trans-fatty acids in U.S. populations, presently data is lacking regarding trends in intake of trans-fatty acids in the population. Furthermore, it is unclear how trends in intake of trans-fatty acids may be related to changes in other dietary and non-dietary CHD risk factors and CHD mortality.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study used newly available nutrient data to recalculate dietary data collected as part of the Minnesota Heart Survey (MHS) to examine trends in intake of trans-fatty acids. The MHS was an ongoing observational epidemiologic study of trends in risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among independent cross-sectional probability samples of the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Surveys were conducted in 1980-1982, 1985-1987, 1990-1992 and 1995-1997. Diet was among the CVD risk factors measured as part of each survey. In this research, 24-hour dietary recalls collected from MHS participants were recalculated using an updated food and nutrient database that included trans-fatty acid values (16:1, 18:1, 18:2, and total). Intake estimates resulting from recalculation were analyzed to examine temporal trends in trans-fatty acid intake between 1980 and 1997, and to examine the relationship of temporal trends in trans-fatty acid intake to temporal changes in other dietary and non-dietary CHD risk factors and changes in CHD mortality. The MHS data provided a unique opportunity to examine a dietary constituent only recently recognized as a potential risk factor for CHD.

Observational
Observational Model: Defined Population
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  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Coronary Disease
  • Heart Diseases
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Harnack L, Lee S, Schakel SF, Duval S, Luepker RV, Arnett DK. Trends in the trans-fatty acid composition of the diet in a metropolitan area: the Minnesota Heart Survey. J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Sep;103(9):1160-6.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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March 2002
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No eligibility criteria

Male
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00006500
941
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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Investigator: Lisa Harnack University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
April 2004

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP