Effects of Estrogen on Memory in Post-Menopausal Women and Patients With Alzheimer's Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Alzheimer's Association
Pfizer
Eisai Inc.
Information provided by:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00006399
First received: August 18, 2000
Last updated: January 13, 2009
Last verified: January 2009

August 18, 2000
January 13, 2009
September 1999
March 2004   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00006399 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
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Effects of Estrogen on Memory in Post-Menopausal Women and Patients With Alzheimer's Disease
Estrogen Modulation Effects on Cholinergic Function in Normal Post-Menopausal Women and Patients With Alzheimer's Disease

The goal of this study is to examine whether the administration of estrogen to post-menopausal women and women with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease will enhance their memory and their capacity for learning.

Estrogen (EST) may have significant benefits in preserving cognitive functioning in normal aging after menopause and in decreasing the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On a molecular level, EST has effects on a variety of cholinergic neuronal and receptor-mediated mechanisms that may be responsible for these beneficial effects. These neurons have critical relevance for the development of age-related cognitive changes and dementing disorders. However, little is known about the clinical relevance of EST-cholinergic interactions, either in normal aging or in AD.

The primary goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that three months of administration of EST to 1) normal post-menopausal women, and 2) female patients with mild-moderate AD who are concurrently treated with anticholinesterase therapy (donepezil), will positively change or blunt the negative and behavioral effects of drugs that block central cholinergic receptors (both muscarinic and nicotinic). Participants will be blindly placed on EST or placebo for three months each. After each three month period, they will be cognitively assessed after receiving single doses of the cholinergic antagonists scopolamine and mecamylamine. These results will have direct implications for the use of EST in post-menopausal women as well as interactive treatment with cholinergic drugs for AD. Researchers plan to recruit a total of 45 women (30 healthy, and 15 patients with AD).

NOTE: This study is only recruiting participants with Alzheimer's Disease at this time.

Interventional
Phase 2
Masking: Double-Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Alzheimer Disease
  • Drug: Donepezil
  • Drug: Estrogen
  • Drug: Progesterone
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
45
March 2004
March 2004   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Normal volunteers and women with mild Alzheimer's disease:
  • Non-smoker
  • No use of Hormone Replacement Therapy for at least one year
  • No menses for at least one year
  • Normal mammogram within the last year
  • minimum age is 45 for patients with Alzheimer's disease; 50 for normal volunteers
  • Maximum age is 85 for patients with Alzheimer's disease; there is no maximum age for normal volunteers.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Women who are currently taking estrogen therapy.
  • Women who are smokers.
  • Women who have had breast cancer.
Female
45 Years to 85 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00006399
IA0023, 2R56AG021476
Not Provided
Paul A. Newhouse, M.D, Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
  • Alzheimer's Association
  • Pfizer
  • Eisai Inc.
Principal Investigator: Paul A. Newhouse, M.D. Memory Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
January 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP