Frequency of Parenteral and Non-Parenteral Exposures to Blood Among Healthcare Workers at the Clinical Center, NIH and at Seven Academic Hospitals in Japan

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001712
First received: November 3, 1999
Last updated: March 3, 2008
Last verified: October 2005

November 3, 1999
March 3, 2008
February 1998
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00001712 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Frequency of Parenteral and Non-Parenteral Exposures to Blood Among Healthcare Workers at the Clinical Center, NIH and at Seven Academic Hospitals in Japan
Frequency of Parenteral and Non-Parenteral Exposures to Blood Among Healthcare Workers at the Clinical Center, NIH and at Seven Academic Hospitals in Japan

Following guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control, the Clinical Center implemented a Universal Precautions policy in November 1987 in an attempt to reduce healthcare workers' risks for occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens. All hospital personnel whose jobs entailed potential exposure to patients' blood and body substances were required to attend a training session and complete a written examination. Based on data from surveys conducted before and twelve months after training in Universal Precautions, the frequency of cutaneous exposure to blood decreased by 50% in temporal association with implementation of Universal Precautions. Staff at the Clinical Center are required to take a refresher course in Universal Precautions annually.

The prevalence of bloodborne infections is high in Japan; however, Universal Precautions are not widely practiced in Japan. This study is designed: 1) to evaluate and compare nurses' knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, occupational risks, and appropriate prevention strategies for managing patients infected with bloodborne pathogens in the healthcare setting in seven university hospitals in Japan and at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in the US; 2) to compare self-reported levels of compliance with existing infection control recommendations designed to limit risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens in all four institutions; 3) to compare self-reported frequencies of cutaneous exposures to blood at the four hospitals in the study; and 4) to evaluate the effect of educational intervention on nurses perceived compliance with recommendations and on the frequency of self-reported exposures to blood.

Following guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control, the Clinical Center implemented a Universal Precautions policy in November 1987 in an attempt to reduce healthcare workers' risks for occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens. All hospital personnel whose jobs entailed potential exposure to patients' blood and body substances were required to attend a training session and complete a written examination. Based on data from surveys conducted before and twelve months after training in Universal Precautions, the frequency of cutaneous exposure to blood decreased by 50% in temporal association with implementation of Universal Precautions. Staff at the Clinical Center are required to take a refresher course in Universal Precautions annually.

The prevalence of bloodborne infections is high in Japan; however, Universal Precautions are not widely practiced in Japan. This study is designed: 1) to evaluate and compare nurses' knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, occupational risks, and appropriate prevention strategies for managing patients infected with bloodborne pathogens in the healthcare setting in seven university hospitals in Japan and at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in the US; 2) to compare self-reported levels of compliance with existing infection control recommendations designed to limit risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens in all four institutions; 3) to compare self-reported frequencies of cutaneous exposures to blood at the four hospitals in the study; and 4) to evaluate the effect of educational intervention on nurses perceived compliance with recommendations and on the frequency of self-reported exposures to blood.

Observational
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  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV Infection
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
3400
October 2005
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Nurses who work in the four cooperating institutions who have clinical responsibilities.

Both
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00001712
980066, 98-CC-0066
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National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
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National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
October 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP