A Study of Dideoxyinosine (ddI) in HIV-Infected Children Who Have Not Had Success With Zidovudine or Who Cannot Take Zidovudine

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000963
First received: November 2, 1999
Last updated: March 28, 2012
Last verified: March 2012

November 2, 1999
March 28, 2012
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00000963 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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A Study of Dideoxyinosine (ddI) in HIV-Infected Children Who Have Not Had Success With Zidovudine or Who Cannot Take Zidovudine
A Randomized Comparative Trial of Two Doses of 2',3'-Dideoxyinosine (ddI) in Children With Symptomatic HIV Infection Who Are Either Unresponsive to Zidovudine and/or Who Are Intolerant to Zidovudine

To evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and tolerance of two doses of didanosine (ddI) in the treatment of children with symptomatic HIV disease who have had to discontinue zidovudine (AZT) because of intolerance and/or who have experienced progressive disease while on AZT.

The progression of immunodeficiency due to HIV infection can be delayed by using AZT. The benefits of AZT in adults with AIDS and severe AIDS-related complex (ARC) appear to last for approximately 12 to 18 months, at which time most patients have progressive deterioration. Recently published literature has described a reduced sensitivity of HIV isolated from patients after prolonged AZT treatment. Although the clinical significance of this is unclear, it makes the development of new antiretroviral drugs important.

The progression of immunodeficiency due to HIV infection can be delayed by using AZT. The benefits of AZT in adults with AIDS and severe AIDS-related complex (ARC) appear to last for approximately 12 to 18 months, at which time most patients have progressive deterioration. Recently published literature has described a reduced sensitivity of HIV isolated from patients after prolonged AZT treatment. Although the clinical significance of this is unclear, it makes the development of new antiretroviral drugs important.

Children who show AZT intolerance and/or progressive disease after 6 months of AZT therapy receive oral ddI at 1 of 2 doses for a minimum of 48 weeks, with a 48-week extension. Patients are seen for clinical and laboratory evaluations at scheduled times during the study. (Per 5/12/92 amendment, new patients will not be enrolled in the pharmacokinetics studies.) Per 10/31/94 amendment: Patients are eligible to receive blinded study drug for an additional 8-16 weeks after the final on-study visit, but no later than 2/15/95.

Interventional
Phase 2
Primary Purpose: Treatment
HIV Infections
Drug: Didanosine
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
300
September 1995
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Inclusion Criteria

Concurrent Medication:

Allowed:

  • Prophylaxis treatment for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP).
  • Immunoglobulin.
  • Maintenance therapy with amphotericin B (l mg/kg) up to 5 days/week.

Concurrent Treatment:

Allowed:

  • Blood transfusions.

Prior Medication:

Allowed:

  • Prophylaxis treatment for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP).

Patients enrolled in ACTG 128 and ACTG 138 must meet study end points or meet protocol definitions for being permanently off zidovudine (AZT) before enrolling in this study.

  • Patients currently enrolled in ACTG 051 who have not reached the study end points but who meet the entry criteria for ACTG 144 may be co-enrolled in ACTG 144.
  • Patient or guardian available to give written informed consent.

Exclusion Criteria

Co-existing Condition:

Patients with the following conditions or symptoms are excluded.

  • Hypersensitivity to didanosine (ddI).
  • Symptomatic cardiomyopathy.
  • Seizures that are not well controlled by ongoing anticonvulsant therapy.
  • Symptomatic pancreatitis.
  • Grade 1 or higher peripheral neuropathy.
  • Active malignancy requiring chemotherapy.

Concurrent Medication:

Excluded:

  • Zidovudine (AZT), other antiretroviral agents, biological modifiers, and investigational medications.

Avoid:

  • Drugs with potential to cause peripheral neuropathy or pancreatitis.

Patients with the following are excluded:

  • Active malignancy requiring concomitant chemotherapy.

Prior Medication:

Excluded:

  • Antiretroviral agents other than zidovudine (AZT) or dideoxycytidine (ddC) within 4 weeks of study entry.
  • Immunomodulating agents such as interferons, isoprinosine, or interleukin-2 within 2 weeks of entry.
  • Any other experimental therapy within 1 week of entry.
  • Drugs that have or will cause prolonged neutropenia, significant pancreatitis, significant nephrotoxicity, or peripheral neuropathy within 1 week of entry.
Both
3 Months to 18 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States,   Puerto Rico
 
NCT00000963
ACTG 144, 11119
Not Provided
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Study Chair: Frenkel LM
Study Chair: Bryson Y
Study Chair: Stiehm R
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
March 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP