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A Study to Compare the Use of Fluconazole as Continuous Therapy Versus Periodic Therapy in HIV-Positive Patients With Recurrent Thrush

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Washington University School of Medicine
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000951
First received: November 2, 1999
Last updated: March 30, 2012
Last verified: March 2012

November 2, 1999
March 30, 2012
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00000951 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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A Study to Compare the Use of Fluconazole as Continuous Therapy Versus Periodic Therapy in HIV-Positive Patients With Recurrent Thrush
A Phase IV Randomized Study of the Use of Fluconazole as Chronic Suppressive Therapy Versus Episodic Therapy in HIV Positive Subjects With Recurrent Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

The purpose of this study is to determine whether it is better to treat patients with fluconazole on a continuous basis to prevent thrush (yeast infection in the mouth) from coming back or to wait and treat each episode of thrush.

Fluconazole is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs to treat thrush and other yeast infections. However, the number of patients with fluconazole-resistant thrush is increasing, and it is not known whether continuous or intermittent use of fluconazole leads to greater resistance. Therefore, it is important to determine the most effective treatment strategy.

This study will evaluate two different management strategies for patients with advanced HIV infection who are at risk for recurrent and fluconazole-refractory oropharyngeal candidiasis. The treatment duration will be at least 24 months in order to evaluate the long-term effects of the treatment strategies on the development of fluconazole-refractory thrush. In addition to investigating antifungal treatment as it relates to fluconazole-refractory infections, the study will evaluate host factors and organism-related factors in order to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal candidiasis and fluconazole-refractory infections.

Prior to randomization to a long-term management strategy using fluconazole, patients are stratified into one of three groups according to their baseline CD4+ count (cells/mm3): 0-49, 50-100, and 101-150. Patients without oropharyngeal candidiasis (no thrush present) at enrollment and those patients who respond (no thrush present) to the initial acute therapy for an active infection are randomized 1:1 to one of two management strategies for fluconazole: Arm A (episodic therapy) or Arm B (chronic suppressive therapy with continuous fluconazole). Patients are then followed for a duration of 24 months after enrollment of the last subject. Patients with active oropharyngeal candidiasis at time of enrollment will be treated with fluconazole for up to 2 weeks and patients who respond (no thrush present) are then randomized to a long-term management strategy. Those who do not respond (refractory disease) to the acute treatment are permanently discontinued from the study. Women in both groups will have the option of being treated for vulvovaginal candidiasis either through or outside the study.

Interventional
Phase 4
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Candidiasis, Oral
  • HIV Infections
Drug: Fluconazole
Not Provided
Swindells S, Evans S, Zackin R, Goldman M, Haubrich R, Filler SG, Balfour HH Jr. Predictive value of HIV-1 viral load on risk for opportunistic infection. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Jun 1;30(2):154-8.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
948
May 2002
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria

You may be eligible for this study if you:

  • Are HIV-positive.
  • Have a CD4+ cell count less than 150 cells/mm3.
  • Had at least one episode of thrush in the 24 months before study entry.
  • Have a life expectancy of at least 12 months.
  • Weigh at least 88 pounds.
  • Are 13 years of age or older (consent of parent or guardian required if under 18).
  • Agree to practice abstinence or use effective methods of birth control during the study.

Exclusion Criteria

You will not be eligible for this study if you:

  • Have an allergy to azoles.
  • Have had 3 episodes or more of thrush within 12 weeks of study entry.
  • Have a history of esophageal candidiasis.
  • Have a history of fluconazole-resistant infection.
  • Have an active opportunistic infection requiring treatment within 14 days before study entry.
  • Have a fungal infection requiring certain medications.
  • Have a severe liver disease (e.g., cirrhosis).
  • Are unable to tolerate oral medications.
  • Take certain medications.
  • Are pregnant or breast-feeding.
Both
13 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States,   Puerto Rico
 
NCT00000951
ACTG 323, 11297
Not Provided
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Washington University School of Medicine
Study Chair: Mitchell Goldman
Study Chair: Scott G. Filler
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
March 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP