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The Effects of Illnesses on HIV Levels in the Body

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000900
First received: November 2, 1999
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: April 1999

November 2, 1999
June 23, 2005
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00000900 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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The Effects of Illnesses on HIV Levels in the Body
The Impact of Intercurrent Illness on HIV Viral Load

To describe the magnitude and duration of changes in HIV-1 RNA levels during and after an acute febrile illness. To identify factors associated with increases, i.e., type of illness ultimately diagnosed (bacterial, viral, fungal), CD4 cell count, and antiretroviral treatment regimen. To describe changes in phenotypic markers of immune activation/dysregulation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte subsets and their relationship to intercurrent illness. To describe changes in plasma cytokines and soluble activation markers and their relationship to plasma HIV-1 viremia during and after the onset of intercurrent illness. To characterize the viral biologic phenotype and the viral drug susceptibility genotype before, during, and after the onset of an acute febrile illness. To characterize the expression of HIV-1 co-receptors before, during, and after the onset of an acute febrile illness Repeated episodes of intercurrent infections have been postulated to be an important stimulus for progression of HIV infection. The study of intercurrent illness in patients with initially undetectable viral load removes viral load as a possible cause for virologic and immunologic changes and allows for a more direct association of the intercurrent illness with changes in viral load, viral HIV-1 phenotypes, viral HIV-1 genotypes, and T cell phenotypes. Studying intercurrent illness and viral load provides an opportunity to characterize the potentially dynamic changes not only in viral load but also in phenotypic markers of T cell activation, plasma cytokine levels, phenotypic and genotypic changes in circulating virus, and HIV-1 tropisms.

Repeated episodes of intercurrent infections have been postulated to be an important stimulus for progression of HIV infection. The study of intercurrent illness in patients with initially undetectable viral load removes viral load as a possible cause for virologic and immunologic changes and allows for a more direct association of the intercurrent illness with changes in viral load, viral HIV-1 phenotypes, viral HIV-1 genotypes, and T cell phenotypes. Studying intercurrent illness and viral load provides an opportunity to characterize the potentially dynamic changes not only in viral load but also in phenotypic markers of T cell activation, plasma cytokine levels, phenotypic and genotypic changes in circulating virus, and HIV-1 tropisms.

This is a study to determine whether patients exhibit a temporary burst of viral replication or other changes in response to intercurrent febrile illness. Although there is no study treatment, patients on this study must be co-enrolled in at least 1 other ACTG antiretroviral treatment study. Plasma HIV-1 RNA and other variables are measured at the time of presentation, on Day 3, and at Weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24.

Observational
Observational Model: Natural History
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
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HIV Infections
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
26
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Inclusion Criteria

Patients must have:

  • HIV-1 infection documented by any licensed ELISA test kit and confirmed by either Western blot, HIV-1 culture, HIV-1 antigen, plasma HIV-1 RNA or a second antibody test by a method other than ELISA at any time prior to study entry.
  • Undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA (by Roche Amplicor Assay) within 8 weeks prior to study entry.
  • Documented temperature above 101degrees F during at least 1 of the 2 days prior to the day of screening and present on the day of screening, or documented temperature above 101 F on the day of the screening but no fever on 1 of the 2 days prior to screening.

[AS PER AMENDMENT 7/7/98:

  • Documented temperature above 101degrees F on the day of the screening.]
  • Co-enrollment in at least 1 other ACTG antiretroviral treatment study (NOTE:
  • Co-enrollment is approved and encouraged with the following ACTG studies:
  • 343, 347, 359, 368, 370, and 372). [AS PER AMENDMENT 7/7/98: Must be enrolled in either an ACTG antiretroviral therapy study or a pharmaceutical company-sponsored antiretroviral therapy study prior to entry. Co-enrolled in a non-ACTG pharmaceutical company-based study must have a baseline viral isolate accessible for use in this study.]
  • Written informed consent of a parent or guardian if under 18 years of age.

Exclusion Criteria

Co-existing Condition:

Patients with the following symptoms or conditions are excluded:

  • Interruption of current antiretroviral therapy due to the onset of acute intercurrent illness.

Concurrent Medication:

Excluded:

  • Patients receiving IL-2.

Patients with the following prior conditions are excluded:

  • Change in antiretroviral therapy combination within 8 weeks prior to study entry.

Required:

  • Concurrent enrollment in an ACTG antiretroviral therapy study [or, AS PER AMENDMENT 7/7/98, in a non-ACTG pharmaceutical company-sponsored antiretroviral treatment study].
  • Stable antiretroviral and/or nucleoside analog therapy for 8 weeks prior to study entry.
Both
13 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00000900
ACTG 891
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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
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Study Chair: Sha B
Study Chair: Currier J
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
April 1999

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP