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The Performance of an Artificial Pancreas at Home in People With Type 1 Diabetes

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified January 2014 by St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Medtronic
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Amin Sharifi, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02040571
First received: January 15, 2014
Last updated: January 25, 2014
Last verified: January 2014
  Purpose

The overall aim of the study is to evaluate the performance of Artificial Pancreas or Closed Loop Glucose-Sensing Insulin-Delivery system in comparison to current best available technology represented by Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy (SAPT) in patients with Type 1 Diabetes.


Condition Intervention
Type 1 Diabetes
Device: Closed Loop
Device: Open Loop

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Impact of the Overnight Closed Loop System on Glycemia, Subsequent Day-time Metabolic Control, Insulin Delivery, Counter Regulatory Hormones, Sleep Quality, Cognition and Satisfaction With Treatment, Compared to Open Loop System (Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy) in Both the Clinical Trial Centre and in the Home Setting in Type 1 Diabetes

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) time spent in target glycaemic range (4.0-8.0 mmol/L) overnight (2000h - 0800h) during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study. [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) time spent in target glycaemic range (4.0-8.0 mmol/L) overnight in clinical trial centre (phase 1 of the study). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in clinical trial centre (phase 1 of the study), an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • CGM time and area under the curve (AUC) spent above target range (>8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time and area under the curve (AUC) spent above target range (>8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time spent in hypoglycaemic range (<4.0 mmol/L and <3.0 mmol/L) and number of episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia (indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time spent in hypoglycaemic range (<4.0 mmol/L and <3.0 mmol/L) and number of episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia (indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM measures of glycaemic variability (standard deviation and margin of error). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM measures of glycaemic variability (standard deviation and margin of error). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Number of episodes of blood ketone-positive hyperglycaemia (blood glucose > 15 mmol/L indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose AND blood ketones greater than or equal to 0.6 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Number of episodes of blood ketone-positive hyperglycaemia (blood glucose > 15 mmol/L indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose AND blood ketones greater than or equal to 0.6 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) glucose measurements in target range (4.0-8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • YSI glucose measurements in hypoglycaemic range (<4.0 mmol/L and <3.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • YSI glycaemic variability (standard deviation). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time in glucose target range (4.0-8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime (0800h - 2000h) during the phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time in glucose target range (4.0-8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each day for 4 days (Day 2-5 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time and area under the curve (AUC) spent above target range (>8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time and area under the curve (AUC) spent above target range (>8.0 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each day for 4 days (Day 2-5 of phase 2) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time spent in hypoglycaemic range (<4.0 mmol/L and <3.0 mmol/L) and number of episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia (indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • CGM time spent in hypoglycaemic range (<4.0 mmol/L and <3.0 mmol/L) and number of episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia (indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each day for 4 days (Day 2-5 of phase 2) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Number of episodes of blood ketone-positive hyperglycaemia (blood glucose > 15 mmol/L indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose AND blood ketones greater than or equal to 0.6 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Number of episodes of blood ketone-positive hyperglycaemia (blood glucose > 15 mmol/L indicated by glucose sensor and confirmed by meter glucose AND blood ketones greater than or equal to 0.6 mmol/L). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each day for 4 days (Day 2-5 of phase 2) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Total insulin delivered (based on pump data) [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Total insulin delivered (based on pump data). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rates and number of changes in the rate of insulin infusion (based on pump data). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rates and number of changes in the rate of insulin infusion (based on pump data). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Closed loop exits (with root cause identified) based on the monitoring by the investigator in real time from a co-located station. [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight in phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Closed loop exits (with root cause identified) based on the remote monitoring by the investigator. [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored overnight during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each night for 4 nights (Day 1-4 of phase 2). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Total basal and total bolus insulin delivered (based on pump data) [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 12 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Total basal and total bolus insulin delivered (based on pump data). [ Time Frame: Participants will be monitored in daytime during the ambulatory phase (Phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 12 hours each day for 4 days (Day 2-5 of phase 2) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Urinary cortisol and catecholamines on 12-hour urine collection. [ Time Frame: Urine sample will be collected between 2000-0800 overnight in phase 1 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Urinary cortisol and catecholamines on 12-hour urine collection. [ Time Frame: Urine sample will be collected between 2000-0800 Overnight on Day 1 and Day 2 of the ambulatory phase (phase 2) of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Area under the curve for overnight plasma cortisol, growth hormone, glucagon, adrenaline and noradrenaline (based on hourly blood sample collection). [ Time Frame: Blood sample will be collected every hour beween 2000h-0800 in phase 1 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Plasma metanephrines (based on blood sample collection) [ Time Frame: At 2000 P.M on Day 1 and 0800 A.M on Day 2 of phase 1 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Plasma Cortisol, growth hormone, glucagon, adrenaline , noradrenaline and metanephrines based on blood sample collection. [ Time Frame: At 0800 A.M on Day 1 and 0800 A.M on Day 5 of phase 2. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Urinary cortisol and catecholamines on 12-hour urine collection. [ Time Frame: Urine sample will be collected during daytime (0800h - 2000h) on Day 2 of phase 1 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Urinary cortisol and catecholamines on 12-hour urine collection. [ Time Frame: Urine sample will be collected during daytime (0800h - 2000h) of Day 1 and Day 2 of the ambulatory phase (phase 2) of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Sleep quality includes: total sleep time, sleep onset latency, sleep-efficiency, and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), total and average activity counts based on Actigraph data. [ Time Frame: Actigraph data will be recorded constantly during Phase 1 of the study, an expected average of 24 hours. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Sleep quality includes: total sleep time, sleep onset latency, sleep-efficiency, and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), total and average activity counts based on Actigraph data and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. [ Time Frame: Actigraph data will be recorded constantly during the ambulatory phase (phase 2) of the study, an expected average of 5 days. Pittsburg Sleep quality Index tool will be done on day 1 and day 5 of phase 2. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Parameters of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress include: Cell Adhesion Molecules, Myeloperoxidase, Oxidised LDL, hs-CRP (based on blood sample collection) and Urinary isoprostanes. [ Time Frame: At 2000 P.M on Day 1 and 0800 A.M on Day 2 of phase 1 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Parameters of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress include: Cell Adhesion Molecules, Myeloperoxidase, Oxidised LDL, hs-CRP (C reactive Protein) based on blood sample collection, and Urinary isoprostanes. [ Time Frame: At 0800 A.M on Day 1 and Day 5 of phase 2. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire and Semi-Structured Interviews (Questionnaires will generate total scores for treatment satisfaction, fear of hypoglycaemia, diabetes-related distress and hypoglycemia impaired awareness). [ Time Frame: On Day 5 of Phase 2 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Cognitive Assessment: CogState assessment battery outcome measures will be generated. Each battery test point will record participant response times and accuracy rates for all tasks performed. [ Time Frame: Twice daily (AM-test and PM-test sessions) on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4, and Day 5 of phase 2 of the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: January 2014
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: January 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Closed Loop Device: Closed Loop
A total of 24 participants with T1 Diabetes with sensor augmented insulin pump therapy (SAPT) experience will be recruited from four tertiary hospitals and will enter an un-masked randomised-control crossover trial, with a run-in period followed by two phases (in-hospital and at-home) in each of two stages (Closed Loop and Open Loop in random order). Closed Loop will be the intervention for this study, and its performance will be assessed compared to Open Loop (control treatment).
Other Name: Closed Loop Glucose-Sensing Insulin-Delivery System
Active Comparator: Open Loop Device: Open Loop

The performance of closed loop system will be compared to open loop system (Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy). Therefore, the Open Loop system will be the control treatment.

In stage 1 of study, participants are randomized to either closed loop (CL) or open loop (OL). In stage 2, all participants will be crossed to the opposite study arm.

Throughout the study, those who randomised to OL will receive exactly the same medical attention as the CL participants.

Other Name: Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy (SAPT)

Detailed Description:

At present, decisions regarding insulin dosing are made by the patient with intermittent support from their medical team. Even with glucose sensor augmented insulin pump therapy (SAPT), representing the most advanced technology currently available, there are emotional and intellectual demands placed upon the patient with the most well-educated, intelligent and diligent patients often unable to perfectly match insulin delivery with their varying requirements. SAPT does improve glycaemia in comparison with insulin pump therapy alone though a significant proportion of patients will still not meet target HbA1c (<7.0%). A Closed Loop (CL) system whereby a computerised algorithm reviews continuous glucose information to determine a T1D patient's insulin requirements and controls insulin delivery will potentially have a major impact upon acute and chronic complications of diabetes as well as upon their quality of life. Overnight glycaemic control, without the added challenge of meals, physical activity and stress, is a realistic initial application of CL in clinical practice.

This study aims to evaluate insulin pump therapy with an overnight CL system in comparison with current best available technology represented by SAPT in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) patients, in both hospital and then at home. Outcomes of interest will include metabolic control and performance of the Medtronic CL overnight system compared with SAPT (OL), in both the Clinical Trials Centre (CTC) and in the home setting; the relationship between night-time and day-time metabolic control with CL and OL and nocturnal clinical, hormonal and inflammatory factors that may influence subsequent daytime metabolic control; anti-insulin antibody titres and dissociation constants (Rd) upon CL algorithm performance; sleep quality, cognition, satisfaction with treatment and psychological parameters.

A two phase randomised crossover study design is to be employed with the first phase conducted for a single night in the clinical trials centre and the second phase over 5 days in an ambulatory setting.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults aged greater than 14 years able to provide informed consent.
  • T1 Diabetes for a minimum of 6 months (fasting C-peptide levels less than 50 pmol/L).
  • HbA1c less than 8.5%.
  • Experience with a continuous glucose sensor with established basal insulin infusion patterns, insulin to carbohydrate ratios, regular use of the insulin bolus calculator, can insert/ change sensor by themselves, can recharge transmitter, and has experience in reading real time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) data.
  • Accurate carbohydrate counting.
  • Experience in uploading pump information to web.
  • Residing in Melbourne or Perth.
  • Willing to comply with the study protocol requirements inclusive of those requirements related to participant safety.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Requiring greater than 150 units of insulin/day.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) within the past 4 weeks.
  • Hypoglycaemic unawareness (Gold score = 4) while on SAPT
  • More than 2 severe hypoglycaemic episodes within the last 12 months
  • Pregnant or planning pregnancy within study period.
  • Renal impairment (eGFR less than 60ml/min).
  • Current or recent (less than 4 weeks) inhaled or oral steroid therapy.
  • Dermatological conditions (eg psoriasis) involving the region of glucose sensor/ insulin delivery cannula insertion.
  • Subject has physical limitations (eg impaired vision) that would compromise operation of the closed loop system.
  • Currently involved in another investigational study.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02040571

Contacts
Contact: Amin Sharifi, M.D +61 3 9288 2211 amin_shrf@yahoo.com

Locations
Australia, Victoria
St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne Recruiting
Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, 3065
Principal Investigator: David Norman O'neal, MBBS, FRACP         
Sub-Investigator: Amin Sharifi, M.D         
Sponsors and Collaborators
St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Medtronic
Investigators
Principal Investigator: David Norman O'neal St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Amin Sharifi, Doctor, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02040571     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: U1111-1151-3297
Study First Received: January 15, 2014
Last Updated: January 25, 2014
Health Authority: Australia: Human Research Ethics Committee

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Insulin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 23, 2014