Trial record 20 of 20 for:    Open Studies | "Poliomyelitis"

Automated SMS Reminders to Parents on Their Cell Phones Can Significantly Improve the on Time Vaccination Rates Children in Pakistan

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified July 2013 by Aga Khan University
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
World Health Organization
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr Abdul Momin Kazi, Aga Khan University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01908946
First received: July 15, 2013
Last updated: July 24, 2013
Last verified: July 2013
  Purpose

The investigators plan to test the effectiveness of reminders to parents/guardians on cell phones through short messaging system (SMS) in improving the on-time routine immunization for children in Pakistan. SMS message as a reminder tool can be very effective in health care settings at public health scale. This study will be conducted in an urban- squatter settlement area, Ibrahim Haidry union council in Karachi. Parents/guardians of children randomized in intervention arm will be sent SMS reminders vaccination visit reminders at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of life.


Condition Intervention
Vaccination Failure
Behavioral: SMS reminders

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Automated SMS Reminders to Parents on Their Cell Phones Can Significantly Improve the on Time Vaccination Rates Among Children in Pakistan

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Aga Khan University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Improvement in the vaccination coverage due to SMS reminders [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 300
Study Start Date: May 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: October 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date: October 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: SMS Reminders
SMS reminders
Behavioral: SMS reminders
SMS reminders for vaccination visit at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of life.
No Intervention: Standard verbal counseling
One time standard verbal counseling at the time of initial visit and timing for EPI vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 weeks

Detailed Description:

The immunization coverage in Pakistan is still well below the desired level, leading to continued polio transmission, large measles outbreaks and thousands of deaths from vaccine-preventable illnesses. A major reason for poor childhood vaccine coverage is the lack of awareness among parents regarding the need for immunization in children, and the importance of completing the entire series of vaccines. This result in significant drop-out between vaccines delivered at birth and later in the infancy period. Customized short messaging system (SMS) text can be designed as personally tailored messages to remind and inquire parents regarding vaccination for their children according to the EPI schedule. We plan to test the effectiveness of reminders to parents/guardians on cell phones through short messaging system (SMS) in improving the on-time routine immunization for children in Pakistan. This study will be conducted in an urban- squatter settlement area, Ibrahim Haidry union council in Karachi, Pakistan. Our experimental plan has three components: First, we will conduct baseline survey of parents at our study site to explore their preferences for text for immunization reminders. Simultaneously, we will develop a computerized application for reminders scheduling. This application will contain the phone number, message information, language preferences and date on which the message will be sent. It will be interfaced with the gateway to send the message. Lastly, we will conduct a randomized controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of automated SMS reminders to parents in improving the on-time vaccination rates in children. If the result shows that the vaccines compliance can be increased through the SMS reminders, this program can be incorporated with the existing systems to collect the cell phone numbers of parents at the time of child's first contact with the health system and sending auto generated reminders for vaccine compliance at national level.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 14 Days
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Child should be less than 14 days of age
  • Parent/guardian or at least one person in the household having a valid cell phone connection
  • Parent/guardian provides consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Child more than 14 days of age
  • Not a valid cell phone connection in the household
  • Parent/guardian not providing consent
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01908946

Contacts
Contact: Abdul M Kazi, MBBS,MPH +92 21 34864335 momin.kazi@aku.edu

Locations
Pakistan
Aga Khan University Recruiting
Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan, 74800
Contact: Abdul M Kazi, MBBs,MPH    +92 21 34864335    momin.kazi@aku.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Aga Khan University
World Health Organization
Investigators
Study Director: Ibrahim M Abdel Rahim, MBBS Ibrahim Mohamed ABDEL RAHIM
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Dr Abdul Momin Kazi, Senior Instructor, Aga Khan University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01908946     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: EM-2013-IER-RPC-TSA-008
Study First Received: July 15, 2013
Last Updated: July 24, 2013
Health Authority: Pakistan: Research Ethics Committee

Keywords provided by Aga Khan University:
Polio

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 01, 2014