Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery

This study is not yet open for participant recruitment. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified July 2013 by Royal College of Music
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Royal College of Music
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01906892
First received: July 16, 2013
Last updated: July 21, 2013
Last verified: July 2013
  Purpose

This study explores the hypothesis that mental health service users, their carers and musicians can - through the creative act of music learning and performing - mutually enhance wellbeing through the development of more meaningful and resilient lives. The project seeks to explore three interconnected issues: (i) the extent to which music learning and performing provides a forum for 'mutual recovery' among adult mental health service users, their formal/informal carers, and musicians, (ii) the characteristic features of 'mutual recovery' through music, and (iii) the underlying mechanisms of such 'mutual recovery'.

The study will consist of three different stages. Stages 1 and 2 will examine the effect of a variety of group activities - including participatory music, listening to live music, listening to recorded music and a non-music control - on psychological scales, saliva samples of stress hormones and cytokines, and subjective experience to see which provide the most relaxing, sociable and supportive environments for mutual recovery. Stage 3 will explore the impact of the most promising musical interventions over longer periods of time.

A systematic review we have just carried out has revealed a major gap in research comparing different music interventions and testing the effects of different lengths of interventions. As a result, our study should help us answer the following questions:

  • Which aspect(s) of music can contribute to mutual recovery?
  • Do carers, patients and musicians all respond to the same activities, or do some musical activities suit certain groups more than others?
  • Do carers, patients and musicians all recover at the same rate?
  • What length of intervention is most effective?

If certain interventions are found to produce stronger results than others, these results could help guide community groups and healthcare settings in their design of music activities and have implications for the spending of arts-in-health budgets.


Condition Intervention
Individuals Experiencing Mild or Moderate Mental Health Issues
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Other: Group drumming (live)
Other: Group drumming (recorded)
Other: Comparative activity

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Wellbeing

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Royal College of Music:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (recorded in the week prior to participation in either 6 or 10 weeks of music interventions) to the end of participation in the music interventions ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Secker's 'Measure of social inclusion for arts and mental health project participants' [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (recorded in the week prior to participation in either 6 or 10 weeks of music interventions) to (a) the end of participation in the music interventions, and (b) 3 months after the end of music interventions ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (recorded in the week prior to participation in either 6 or 10 weeks of music interventions) to (a) the end of participation in the music interventions, and (b) 3 months after the end of music interventions ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (recorded in the week prior to participation in either 6 or 10 weeks of music interventions) to (a) the end of participation in the music interventions, and (b) 3 months after the end of music interventions ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Saliva levels of cortisol [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (taken immediately before the music intervention) when measured immediately following the 60 or 90 minute music intervention session ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Blood pressure [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (taken immediately before the music intervention) when measured immediately following the 60 or 90 minute music intervention session ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Saliva levels of salivary immunoglobulin A [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (taken immediately before the music intervention) when measured immediately following the 60 or 90 minute music intervention session ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Saliva levels of interleukin 6 [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (taken immediately before the music intervention) when measured immediately following the 60 or 90 minute music intervention session ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Heart rate [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (taken immediately before the music intervention) when measured immediately following the 60 or 90 minute music intervention session ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 250
Study Start Date: November 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: March 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1a
6 weeks of group drumming workshops
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops
Experimental: 1b
6 weeks of group drumming workshops
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops
Experimental: 2a
2 weeks of active group drumming followed by 2 weeks of control activity involving a literary-based activity
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops
Other: Comparative activity
Taking part in a literary-based activity
Active Comparator: 2b
2 weeks of the literary-based comparative activity followed by 2 weeks of watching live group drumming
Other: Group drumming (live)
Listening to live performances of group drumming
Other: Comparative activity
Taking part in a literary-based activity
Active Comparator: 2c
2 weeks of listening to live group drumming followed by 2 weeks of listening to recordings of group drumming
Other: Group drumming (live)
Listening to live performances of group drumming
Other: Group drumming (recorded)
Listening to recorded performances of group drumming
Active Comparator: 2d
2 weeks of listening to recorded group drumming followed by 2 weeks of participation in group drumming
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops
Other: Group drumming (recorded)
Listening to recorded performances of group drumming
Experimental: 3a
10 weeks of participatory group drumming workshops
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops
Active Comparator: 3b
10 weeks of other active music workshops
Other: Group drumming (participatory)
Active participation in group drumming workshops

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals of either gender and over the age of 18 who are experiencing mild or moderate mental health issues including but not limited to: stress, anxiety, depression etc.
  • Individuals of either gender and over the age of 18 who formally or informally care for mental health service users.
  • Musicians who are professional workshop leaders and music students training to be professional musicians.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Serious mental health problems which might

    1. prevent an individual from giving informed consent
    2. cause the individual to be a disruption to other participants
  • Individuals for whom the music activity might conflict with other routine care.
  • Individuals with gum disease which would invalidate saliva samples.
  • Total deafness or severely impaired hearing.
  • Musicians or music students who apply to participate in the project but who are not deemed to have sufficient experience or expertise.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01906892

Contacts
Contact: Aaron Williamon, PhD aaron.williamon@rcm.ac.uk
Contact: Daisy Fancourt, MMus, BA(Oxon), DipABRSM 0044 7958 065 563 daisy.fancourt@rcm.ac.uk

Locations
United Kingdom
Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music Not yet recruiting
London, United Kingdom, SW7 2BS
Contact: Daisy Fancourt, MMus, BA(Oxon), DipABRSM    0044 7958 065 563    daisy.fancourt@rcm.ac.uk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Royal College of Music
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Aaron Williamon, PhD Royal College of Music
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Royal College of Music
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01906892     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AH/K003364/1
Study First Received: July 16, 2013
Last Updated: July 21, 2013
Health Authority: United Kingdom: National Institute for Health Research

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 19, 2014