Peer-mentored Cooking Classes for Parents of Toddlers: Do Families Cook More and Eat Healthier After the Intervention?

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01710423
First received: October 17, 2012
Last updated: October 30, 2013
Last verified: October 2013
  Purpose

This study aims to test the effectiveness of a community-located, peer mentored intervention to improve home food preparation practices in families with young children.


Condition Intervention
Obesity
Behavioral: Peer mentoring intervention ('Cooking with Friends')

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Improving Home Food Preparation Practices Among Families With Young Children: A Peer Mentoring Intervention

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • 24-hour dietary recall [ Time Frame: 23 weeks from Baseline ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome will be the change in healthfulness of the diet as measured by 24-hour dietary recalls for participants through the course of the study. Study staff will meet with each participant and ask them to list all foods and beverages eaten during the previous day. The results will be analyzed for consumption of specific food-groups (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy, etc.). The primary endpoint is the difference in the healthfulness of the diet (as measured by 24-hour dietary recall) between the immediate intervention group and the control group at week 23.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Cooking-related self-efficacy [ Time Frame: 23 weeks from Baseline ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Self-efficacy related to cooking will be measured using a 25-item instrument. We will assess to assess the difference between the immediate intervention group and the control group at week 23.

  • Home food preparation practices [ Time Frame: 23 weeks from Baseline ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Home food preparation practices will be measured using questions from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We will measure the difference in home food preparation practices between the immediate intervention group and the control group at week 23.

  • Body mass index [ Time Frame: 43 weeks from Baseline ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    We will measure the change in parent and child body mass index before and after the intervention.


Enrollment: 47
Study Start Date: November 2012
Estimated Study Completion Date: November 2013
Primary Completion Date: May 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Immediate Intervention
Peer mentoring intervention ('Cooking with Friends')
Behavioral: Peer mentoring intervention ('Cooking with Friends')

'Cooking with Friends' is a community-located, peer mentoring intervention aimed at improving home food preparation practices in families with young children.

The intervention was developed in an iterative, community-based research approach, and will be conducted in partnership with Early Head Start (EHS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Cooking with Friends builds on existing monthly cooking classes at EHS that have proven popular with EHS families. This intervention will explore topics related to obtaining and preparing healthy foods at home, through 6 classes held weekly over a 6-week period.

A novel innovation of this intervention is the introduction of a peer mentoring component. Peer mentoring approaches have been shown to be effective in chronic disease management among adults. This intervention pairs peer mentors to individual mentees in a community setting, building on previous work to effect behavioral change among caregivers of young children.

No Intervention: Delayed Entry Control

Detailed Description:

Barriers to healthy eating and active living are at the heart of the obesity epidemic. This study focuses on a key factor underlying healthy eating: home food preparation. Preparing food at home entails a sequence of steps from obtaining food, to planning and cooking or preparing meals, to finally serving and eating the meal. Many strategies to curb obesity in children focus on eliminating processed and fast food from the diet, as well as improving access to fresh produce and other healthy ingredients. A collective ability to regularly and reliably prepare healthy food at home is implicit in these and other prevention strategies. Little research, however, has grappled with the phenomenon that there has been a generational loss of home food preparation ability over the past few decades. What is urgently needed is to design effective, enticing, and scalable interventions to improve home food preparation practices across diverse groups.

This study aims to test the effectiveness of a community-located, peer mentored intervention to improve home food preparation practices in families with young children. The investigators will partner with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Early Head Start, a community-based organization serving families with children ages 0 to 3 years in West Philadelphia, aiming specifically to:

  1. Use the principles of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to design, evaluate and disseminate a peer mentored intervention aimed at improving home food preparation practices among families with young children.
  2. Conduct a randomized controlled trial with a delayed entry control group to test the effect of the intervention on three outcomes: home food preparation practices, healthfulness of the diet, and cooking-related self-efficacy.

The investigators hypothesize that families participating in this intervention will demonstrate improvement in parental self-efficacy related to cooking, home food preparation practices, and the healthfulness of parents' and toddlers' diets post-intervention, compared to families who do not participate in the intervention.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Mentee Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Eligible mentees will be caregivers of 0-3 year old children who are enrolled in Early Head Start at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP EHS) at the time of recruitment.
  2. Caregiver enrollment in CHOP EHS requires the following:

    1. Children are 0-3 years old (Expectant mothers are also eligible to enroll)
    2. The family has an income at or below federal poverty level
    3. The family lives in West Philadelphia, within the geographic area served by CHOP EHS.
  3. Caregiver is able to give informed consent.

Mentor Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Eligible peer mentors should meet the inclusion criteria set for above for mentees.
  2. The study team, in conjunction with EHS staff, will decide which participants will be invited to be peer mentors, based on attributes including interest, leadership ability, and home food preparation skills.

Children Inclusion Criteria:

  1. 0-3 year old children of mentee caregivers enrolled in the study
  2. If a mentee caregiver has more than one child currently enrolled in CHOP EHS, then all their eligible children will be enrolled in the study.
  3. If there are expectant mothers who are enrolled as mentees, their children will be enrolled in the study upon delivery.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Caregivers and children not meeting the inclusion criteria above.
  2. Subjects who, in the opinion of the Investigator, may be unable to participate in the study schedules or procedures.
  3. Children of peer mentors will not be eligible for this study.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01710423

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Senbagam Virudachalam, MD, MSHP Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01710423     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 12-009579
Study First Received: October 17, 2012
Last Updated: October 30, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:
Obesity
Nutrition
Home Food Preparation
Peer Mentoring
Early Head Start
Cooking
Diet

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014