Trial record 1 of 4 for:    "hereditary fructose intolerance" OR "Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors" OR "Fructose Intolerance"
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Is the Expression of the GLUT5 Specific Fructose Transport Protein Abnormal in Patients With Fructose Intolerance?

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
C. Wilder-Smith, Brain-Gut Research Group
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01705171
First received: October 9, 2012
Last updated: March 10, 2014
Last verified: March 2014
  Purpose

In this study we will investigate the expression of the fructose transport protein GLUT5 in the small intestine in patients with functional GI disoders and fructose intolerance compared to matched healthy controls.


Condition
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Fructose Intolerance

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Is the Expression of the GLUT5 Specific Fructose Transport Protein Abnormal in Patients With Fructose Intolerance?

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Brain-Gut Research Group:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • mRNA and protein expression of Glut5 [ Time Frame: on day of endoscopy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • mRNA and protein expression of Glut2 [ Time Frame: on day of endoscopy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 20
Study Start Date: December 2011
Study Completion Date: October 2013
Primary Completion Date: May 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
IBS patients with fructose intolerance
analysis of biopsies
Control group: no IBS or fructose intolerance
analysis of biopsies

Detailed Description:

Intolerances to food are a major complaint of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) and even commoner in patients with inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD) (Barrett JS et al. Aliment Pharmacol Therap 2009;30:165-174). The most common forms of food intolerance are FODMAP (fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharide and polyol) -related, of which fructose and lactose are the best known. The prevalence of lactose and fructose intolerance in IBS patients is between 50 and 70% (Wilder-Smith CH et al. Gastroenterology 2009;136 (Suppl. 1): A324). Recent high quality studies have shown that the reduction of ingested FODMAP can lead to significant and long-term symptom improvement in patients shown to be intolerant by breath-testing. While the pathophysiology behind lactose intolerance is the reduction in small intestinal lactase availability, the mechanism in fructose intolerance and its relationship to malabsorption are unknown. One possible and so far uninvestigated mechanism is a reduction in the expression or activity of the specific fructose transporter, GLUT5, which is mainly responsible for luminal absorption of fructose. GLUT5 is mainly found in the small intestine, as well as various extra-intestinal organs. The clinical relevance of GLUT5 expression for food intolerances in humans has not been reported, but in a mouse model deletion of GLUT5 led to decreased absorption of dietary fructose and typical signs of malabsorption (Barone S et al. J Biol Chem 2009;284:5056-5066). The control of GLUT5 is dynamic and considerable upregulation together with increased absorption of fructose is evident in diabetes mellitus, while expression is decreased by inflammation and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin, an integral component of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria, through the action of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TFN-a.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 60 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Patients referred to our practice for evaluation of symptoms consistent with FGID undergoing upper GI endoscopy with biopsy and fructose breath testing as part of their usual clinical evaluation.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients referred to our practice for evaluation of symptoms consistent with FGID undergoing upper GI endoscopy with biopsy and fructose breath testing as part of their usual clinical evaluation. Male or female patients aged between 18 and 60 years with FGID (Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Functional Dyspepsia (FD) or Functional Bloating (FB), as defined by Rome III criteria.
  • Successive patients without fructose intolerance undergoing upper GI endoscopy for other reasons without inflammatory disease

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inflammatory GI disease, coeliac's disease, other relevant systemic disorders as judged by investigator, concomitant antiinflammtory treatments, absent informed consent.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01705171

Locations
Switzerland
Gastoenterology Group Practice
Bern, Switzerland
Sponsors and Collaborators
Brain-Gut Research Group
Investigators
Principal Investigator: C Wilder-Smith, MD Brain-Gut Research Group
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: C. Wilder-Smith, Dr. med., Brain-Gut Research Group
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01705171     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: GGP1345012, GLUT5
Study First Received: October 9, 2012
Last Updated: March 10, 2014
Health Authority: Switzerland: Ethikkommission

Keywords provided by Brain-Gut Research Group:
IBS
fructose intolerance
GLUT 5
GLUT 2

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Fructose Intolerance
Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Metabolic Diseases
Colonic Diseases, Functional
Colonic Diseases
Intestinal Diseases
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Digestive System Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 24, 2014