Are You Sitting Down: Cognitive Exectutive Function Task Comparison Between Seated and Standing Positions (sitstandcef)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Royal Academy of Engineering
Microsoft Research
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
M C Schraefel, University of Southampton
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01641588
First received: July 11, 2012
Last updated: July 12, 2012
Last verified: July 2012
  Purpose

The aim of this trial has been to explore the effects of self-positioning on cognitive performance in the work environment using a standardized cognitive test battery to evaluate executive function under two conditions: sitting and standing.


Condition Intervention Phase
(Focus) Posture Effect on Cognitive Performance
Behavioral: posture: sitting or standing
Phase 1
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Are You Sitting Down: Cognitive Exectutive Function Task Comparison Between Seated and Standing Positions Using Assessments From CNS Vital Signs Test Battery

Further study details as provided by University of Southampton:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • evidence of postural effect on cognitive performance [ Time Frame: within the hour ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    use of standard cognitive exectutive function measures carried out in seated / standing position.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Interaction between posture and phyiological state against cognitive executive function performance [ Time Frame: with the hour ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Other key measures that will be used to evaluate the intervention are heart rate variablility, heart rate and eeg.


Enrollment: 19
Study Start Date: March 2012
Study Completion Date: March 2012
Primary Completion Date: March 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Behavioral: posture: sitting or standing
    Intervention: postural position - whether seated or standing. The person carries out a battery of cognitive executive functioning assessments delivered via a laptop and carried out with the laptop keyboard while either seated or standing.
    Other Name: (no other names)
Detailed Description:

The aim of this trial has been to explore the effects of self-positioning on cognitive performance in the work environment using a standardized cognitive test battery to evaluate executive function under two conditions: sitting and standing.

Methods: This counterbalanced controlled trial involved 17 men (mean age +/-SD: 29.8 +/- 5.5) all with a science background and graduate degrees. The participants were accustomed to working in an open environment and none of whom currently using standing desks. We used a modified version of the CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) test battery to assess cognitive executive function (CEF) in two typical work positions - standing and seated. Participants were randomly assigned to a standing or seated position to begin the testing procedure. Upon completion of the first test round they were instructed to rest for 10 min. in a dark room with no distractions before commencing the second round of testing positioned in the alternate fashion. The main outcome measure was a CNSVS score in each of the six CEF domains in the two different work positions

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 40 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • male
  • computer savvy
  • advanced education degree

Exclusion Criteria:

  • ADD
  • on any medication
  • currently a person who uses a standing desk
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01641588

Locations
United Kingdom
University of Southampton
Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO171BJ
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Southampton
Royal Academy of Engineering
Microsoft Research
Investigators
Principal Investigator: m.c. schraefel, phd University of Southampton
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: M C Schraefel, Professor, University of Southampton
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01641588     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1497, RAEngSRF
Study First Received: July 11, 2012
Last Updated: July 12, 2012
Health Authority: UK: Research Council UK (RCUK)

Keywords provided by University of Southampton:
cognitive executive function
posture
cognitive performance
heart rate
eeg

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 22, 2014