Problems Associated With Ultramarathon (CHAMONIX2)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01602146
First received: May 2, 2012
Last updated: November 9, 2012
Last verified: November 2012
  Purpose

Acute physiological consequences of ultramarathon running are still unknown, particularly in women. Results from the investigators first studies conducted in 2009 have shown that a large part of fatigue induced by a mountain ultramarathon could be attributed to central fatigue. The investigators have investigated the biological consequences and neuromuscular fatigue only in male runners. Data from the literature suggest that amplitude and etiology of fatigue after prolonged exercise might be gender-dependant.The main purpose of the present project is thus to quantify supraspinal central fatigue and associated changes in cortical excitability after an extreme exercise such as a mountain ultramarathon: the Ultra-Trail du Mont-blanc, by using TMS.


Condition Intervention
Ultramarathon Runner
Other: ultramarathon running

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Acute and Chronic Problems Associated With the Practice of Mountain Ultramarathon

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • central fatigue [ Time Frame: Immediatly after the Mont Blanc ultramarathon ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    quantify supraspinal central fatigue


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • neuromuscular and biological alterations [ Time Frame: Immediatly after the Mont Blanc ultramarathon ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    compare neuromuscular and biological alterations induced by a mountain ultramarathon between males and females matched by age and level of performance

  • kidney consequences [ Time Frame: Immediatly after the Mont Blanc ultramarathon ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Evaluate, by biological urine and blood samples, the consequences of a mountain ultramarathon on kidneys

  • hormonal status and bone mineral density [ Time Frame: Immediatly after the Mont Blanc ultramarathon ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    investigate the hormonal status and bone mineral density of a group of male and female runners who take part to this type of event regularly


Enrollment: 35
Study Start Date: June 2012
Study Completion Date: September 2012
Primary Completion Date: September 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
ultramarathon runner
People who do the Mont Blanc ultramarathon (31/08/12 to 02/09/12)
Other: ultramarathon running
  • blood samples before and after ultramarathon
  • urinary samples before and after ultramarathon
  • voluntary ant electrically muscular forces measuring before and after ultramarathon
  • Broadband ultrasound Attenuation before and after ultramarathon

Detailed Description:

Acute physiological consequences of ultramarathon running are still unknown, particularly in women. Results from our first studies conducted in 2009 have shown that a large part of fatigue induced by a mountain ultramarathon could be attributed to central fatigue. Indeed, during extreme exercises such as 24h running, strength losses of knee extensor muscles have reached -40% and ¾ of this fatigue was explain by a central deficit while peripheral mechanisms explained only ¼. Similar results have been reported after a mountain ultramarathon despite the fact that several downhill have induced number of eccentric contractions. As a consequence, central fatigue must be particularly investigated. For this purpose, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been recently validated to measure supraspinal central fatigue and cortical excitability.

We have investigated the biological consequences and neuromuscular fatigue only in male runners. Data from the literature suggest that amplitude and etiology of fatigue after prolonged exercise might be gender-dependant. However, these physiological data and studies that have paired male and female by level of performance on shorter distances seem contradictory with performance comparison between genders so that the relative superiority of women in ultra-endurance is not ascertained. The hypothesis of a greater fatigue resistance after ultramarathons in women should then be tested. The biological consequences of ultramarathon are far to be negligible in terms of inflammatory syndrome but complete characterization of this syndrome after such an extreme exercise has yet to be done. Also, several cases of renal failure have been reported after ultramarathons. Evaluation of ultramarathon consequences on kidneys is necessary to prevent serious complications. Finally, consequences of an ultramarathon are not only linked to races but also to training, i.e. the prolonged time spent in running to prepare for the races. Energy expenditure can be more than twice the normal one and repeated impact may potentially alter bone metabolism but to the best of our knowledge, there is no study that have assessed the effects of ultra-endurance running on bone tissue, particularly in males.

The main purpose of the present project is thus to quantify supraspinal central fatigue and associated changes in cortical excitability after an extreme exercise such as a mountain ultramarathon: the Ultra-Trail du Mont-blanc, by using TMS. The secondary purpose are (i) to compare neuromuscular and biological alterations induced by a mountain ultramarathon between males and females matched by age and level of performance, (ii) to evaluate, by biological urine and blood samples, the consequences of a mountain ultramarathon on kidneys and (iii) to investigate the hormonal status and bone mineral density of a group of male and female runners who take part to this type of event regularly.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 60 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

ultramarathon runner

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • participating to Mont-Blanc ultramarathon
  • participation in at least two ultra-endurance races like Trail

Exclusion Criteria:

  • injury within 3 months before the race
  • joint pathology
  • contra indication for magnetic stimulation transcranial
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01602146

Locations
France
CHU de Saint-Etienne
Saint-etienne, France, 42000
Sponsors and Collaborators
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Leonard FEASSON, MD CHU SAINT-ETIENNE
Study Chair: Guillaume MILLET, PhD Université de Saint-Etienne
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01602146     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1208048, 2012-A00424-39
Study First Received: May 2, 2012
Last Updated: November 9, 2012
Health Authority: France: Afssaps - Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Saint-Denis)

Keywords provided by Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne:
ultramarathon central fatigue,

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014