The Impact of Short-term Financial Incentives on Sexual Behavior and HIV Incidence in Lesotho

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified May 2012 by Bocconi University.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
World Bank
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Bocconi University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01589965
First received: April 19, 2010
Last updated: May 1, 2012
Last verified: May 2012
  Purpose

The HIV/AIDS epidemic is a major concern in many countries. The epidemic is especially acute in Lesotho where roughly one quarter of the population is infected by HIV/AIDS. In Lesotho, and elsewhere, new innovative approaches to induce safer sexual behavior have been desperately called for, particularly in view of the limited impact that existing prevention schemes have had on the trajectory of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

One of the key questions is to understand why individuals get involved in short-term risky sexual behavior when the potential long-term cost of becoming HIV infected is so high? A follow-up question is what replicable and feasible interventions can affect this trade-off between short and long run returns? The primary aim of this study is to evaluate whether the use of short-term financial incentives can affect this trade-off, thereby influencing young individuals' decisions with respect to sexual and reproductive health behavior, and thus in the end reduce HIV incidence rates. The investigators will study this question using a sample of population attending served by New Start Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) sites that a local NGO, Population Service International (PSI), has already implemented in Lesotho.

The investigators propose to conduct a randomized controlled trial to test whether adding a financial incentive to remain STI-negative in the form of a lottery can promote safer sexual activity. The lotteries will work as follows: if the individual is tested negative on a set of curable STIs, she will get a lottery ticket with the chance to win a "big" prize. If she is tested positive, she will receive free treatment, but no lottery ticket. If an individual who tested positive is cured, she can come back in the lottery system and get a later chance to win the lottery ticket if she remains STI-negative. The outcome will be to measure the impact of financial incentives on HIV incidence after two years.

The results of this research project will be disseminated through academic and non-academic conferences, workshops, publications in academic journals, and also in policy journals with the aim to reach out to policy makers outside the research community.


Condition Intervention Phase
AIDS/HIV PROBLEM
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Behavioral: Financial incentive through lotteries
Phase 0

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: The Impact of Short-term Financial Incentives on Sexual Behavior and HIV Incidence Among Youth: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Field Trial in Lesotho

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Bocconi University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • HIV prevalence [ Time Frame: 2 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • STI prevalence (Chlamydia, Syphilis, Trichomoniasis) [ Time Frame: 2 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 5000
Study Start Date: February 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2012
Primary Completion Date: February 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Treatment group: T5
Small Lottery reward
Behavioral: Financial incentive through lotteries
Introduction of financial incentives in the form of a lottery to remain/become STI-negative, which we believe is both replicable and relatively easy to scale-up.
Other Name: Behavioral
No Intervention: Control group
Experimental: Treatment group T1
High Lottery reward
Behavioral: Financial incentive through lotteries
Introduction of financial incentives in the form of a lottery to remain/become STI-negative, which we believe is both replicable and relatively easy to scale-up.
Other Name: Behavioral

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 45 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS ans STI

Exclusion Criteria:

  • none
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01589965

Locations
United Kingdom
Lucia Corno
London, United Kingdom
Sponsors and Collaborators
Bocconi University
World Bank
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Damien de Walque, Phd World Bank
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Bocconi University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01589965     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 100
Study First Received: April 19, 2010
Last Updated: May 1, 2012
Health Authority: Italy: Ethics Committee

Keywords provided by Bocconi University:
HIV/AIDS
STIs
Lottery

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Infection
Virus Diseases
Genital Diseases, Male
Genital Diseases, Female

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 22, 2014