Genetic and Physiological Aspects of Oxidative Profile in Sleep and Well-succeed Aging

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified November 2011 by Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Diego Robles Mazzotti, Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01480037
First received: November 23, 2011
Last updated: November 25, 2011
Last verified: November 2011
  Purpose

The present study proposes the characterization of sleep patterns of healthy young adults, elderly individuals and individuals above 85 years old, using polysomnographic recordings, in order to clarify the importance of sleep in longevity. Furthermore, this study intends to analyze the oxidative stress-related gene expression in peripheral blood of the three studied groups, using the Superarray - RT2 Profiler" PCR Array System. After the identification of genes whose expression pattern among groups suggest a more specific role in longevity, the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, including DNA methylation patterns and microRNA expression, as well as the possible genomic sources of variation in these genes will be investigated. In addition, the oldest individual (105 years-old) will have his whole genome sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology, in order to identify rare variants associated with longevity. Subsequently, the effect of the polymorphisms and rare variants identified will be confirmed in an expanded sample constituted of individuals with various age-ranges. The study will provide a better characterization of molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in longevity, hoping to contribute to the development of more advanced clinical tools, capable to offer a better quality of life for the elderly.


Condition
Aging; Without Mention of Psychosis

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Genetic and Physiological Aspects of Oxidative Profile in Sleep and Well-succeed Aging

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa:

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA

Blood samples collected for DNA and RNA extraction, as well as for laboratory examinations


Enrollment: 38
Study Start Date: March 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: February 2013
Primary Completion Date: June 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Elderly
Individuals between 60 and 70 years-old
Long-lived
Individuals above 85 years-old
Young
Individuals between 20 and 30 years-old

Detailed Description:

In the last decades, the increase in life expectancy highlights the world population aging as an irreversible process. The oxidative stress hypothesis of aging suggests that accumulation of oxidative damage during lifespan may be related to loss of cellular functions, a process normally associated with senescence. However, it has been proposed that individuals who live longer in a successful manner tend to be more adapted against aging physiological changes. Sleep is essential in maintaining health and well-being. Growing evidence suggests interrelationships between oxidative stress and sleep, while the latter is an important mechanism involved in redox balance maintenance. Therefore, the present study proposes the characterization of sleep patterns of healthy young adults, elderly individuals and individuals above 85 years old, using polysomnographic recordings, in order to clarify the importance of sleep in longevity. Furthermore, this study intends to analyze the oxidative stress-related gene expression in peripheral blood of the three studied groups, using the Superarray - RT2 Profiler" PCR Array System. After the identification of genes whose expression pattern among groups suggest a more specific role in longevity, the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, including DNA methylation patterns and microRNA expression, as well as the possible genomic sources of variation in these genes will be investigated. In addition, the oldest individual (105 years-old) will have his whole genome sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology, in order to identify rare variants associated with longevity. Subsequently, the effect of the polymorphisms and rare variants identified will be confirmed in an expanded sample constituted of individuals with various age-ranges. The study will provide a better characterization of molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in longevity, hoping to contribute to the development of more advanced clinical tools, capable to offer a better quality of life for the elderly.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Residents of São Paulo city, Brazil

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • men aged between 20-30 years-old,
  • 60-70 years-old and above 90 years-old

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Uncontrolled chronic disease (cancer, cardiopathy, type 2 diabetes)
  • neurological and/or psychiatric antecedents
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01480037

Locations
Brazil
Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa
São Paulo, Brazil, 04024002
Sponsors and Collaborators
Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa
Investigators
Study Director: Sergio Tufik, MD PhD Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Diego Robles Mazzotti, Associação Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01480037     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: LONG-2011
Study First Received: November 23, 2011
Last Updated: November 25, 2011
Health Authority: Brazil: National Committee of Ethics in Research

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Mental Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014