Mental Imagery Enhances Proprioception in Patients With Low Back Pain (MI)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ahmad Rifai Sarraj, Lebanese University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01469949
First received: November 7, 2011
Last updated: November 9, 2011
Last verified: November 2011
  Purpose

Mental imagery has been used in a variety of pathological instances in support to classical therapeutic treatments. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of internal Kinesthetic and external Visual Imagery to improve proprioceptive feedback in low back pain. Fifty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were included in two experimental groups who used mental imagery and one control group who did not. The results showed the effectiveness of the Internal Kinesthetic Imagery to improve the accuracy of repositioning of lumbo-sacral spine that may subsequently improve the quality of the proprioceptive input. The possibility to use effectively mental imagery, as a part of proprioceptive rehabilitation process, is the principal outcome of this study.


Condition Intervention
Low Back Pain
Other: Watching or imagining movement

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Effect of Mental Imagery in Improvement of the Repositioning Accuracy and Proprioception in Patients With Low Back Pain

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Lebanese University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Accuracy of Lumbar Spine Repositioning [ Time Frame: 2hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Before and after the intervention (Kinesthetic or visual Imagery)


Enrollment: 55
Study Start Date: May 2011
Study Completion Date: July 2011
Primary Completion Date: June 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
Kinesthetic Imagery group
Subjects receiving Kinesthetic Imagery
Other: Watching or imagining movement
Mental imagery are administered in two forms : kinesthetic when subjects imagine the movement of flexion and extension of the lumbar spine and Visual when subjects watch a video of a third person doing the flexion and extension movement
Visual Imagery Group
Subjects receiving visual imagery
Other: Watching or imagining movement
Mental imagery are administered in two forms : kinesthetic when subjects imagine the movement of flexion and extension of the lumbar spine and Visual when subjects watch a video of a third person doing the flexion and extension movement
Control group
Subjects receiving measurement with intervention

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 21 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Fifty-five patients, with a history of common low back pain, have participated to the study. The subjects have been randomly distributed in two experimental groups and one control group. The gender, age, weight and height characteristics of the three groups (Visual Imagery Group, VIG; Kinesthetic Imagery Group, KIG; and Control Group, CG) are presented in Table 1. The patients presented no history of neurological or psychiatric disease, and gave their informed written consent.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Subjects suffering from common non-specific low back pain

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Recent history of inner ear infection causing associated balance or coordination problems
  • History of cerebral trauma followed by unresolved neurosensory symptoms
  • Recent history of vestibular disorder and previous spinal surgery
  • An involvement in specific balance or stabilization training during the 6 months prior testing. Patients taking pain medication were excluded from the study.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01469949

Locations
Lebanon
Center of Physical Therapy
Beirut, Hadath, Lebanon
Sponsors and Collaborators
Lebanese University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Ahmad Rifai Sarraj, Head of Department of Physical Therapy, Lebanese University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01469949     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: LEBUNIV001
Study First Received: November 7, 2011
Last Updated: November 9, 2011
Health Authority: Lebanon: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Lebanese University:
Improvement of the accuracy of Lumbar repositioning

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Back Pain
Low Back Pain
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 26, 2014