Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training (CRAFT) for Problem Gambling

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2011 by Colchester East Hants Health Authority.
Recruitment status was  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Pictou County Health Authority
University of Calgary
Dalhousie University
Information provided by:
Colchester East Hants Health Authority
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01340274
First received: February 4, 2011
Last updated: April 21, 2011
Last verified: April 2011
  Purpose

Nova Scotia is experiencing a proliferation of gambling opportunities and their related gambling problems. The 2003 Nova Scotia Prevalence Study (2004) found that approximately 50,000 adult Nova Scotians are at some risk for problem gambling and that approximately 93,000 adult Nova Scotians are intimately connected to at least one person who has a gambling problem. The serious consequences of problem gambling are being felt by the Individuals engaging in Problem Gambling (IPGs), their Concerned Significant Others (CSOs) and their Communities.

Very few IPGs access support services for their gambling problems. Some reports (National Gambling Impact Study Commission 1999) have found that only 3% of IPGs seek treatment. The Nova Scotia Gambling Prevalence Study (2004) states: "Overall, 3.5% (26,000 adults) have been motivated to help someone else with a current gambling problem versus 0.5% (3,700 adults) seeking assistance or information for a personal problem". While the CSOs of IPGs are seven times more likely to access professional addiction treatment the options for these individuals are limited and treatment programs often lack evidence in support of their effectiveness.

The Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) (Meyers & Wolfe 2004) approach provides significant benefits to the CSOs of persons abusing alcohol and other drugs. They benefits include: improvement in the quality of life of the CSOs; increasing the rate of substance abusers entering treatment; and decreased substance use. CRAFT empowers CSOs by providing tools to positively influence theirs and their significant other's behavior.

The current study investigates the applicability and effectiveness of the CRAFT approach to the CSOs of IPGS.

It is predicted that benefits to the CSOs receiving CRAFT will significantly surpass those receiving treatment as usual. The predicted benefits are: improvement in quality of life for the CSO; engagement of IPGs in treatment; and decreased gambling by the IPGs. With these achieved outcomes, this research will provide opportunity for earlier intervention, improved individual and family functioning and a reduction of the negative impact of problem gambling on the community.


Condition Intervention Phase
Pathological Gambling
Behavioral: CRAFT treatment
Behavioral: Treatment as Usual
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Evaluating the Benefits of the Community Reinforcement and Family Training(CRAFT) Approach to Concerned Significant Others(CSO) of Individuals Engaged in Problem Gambling (IPGs)

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Colchester East Hants Health Authority:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Concerned Significant Other Status (Quality of Life) [ Time Frame: Baseline: At 0 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    Measured through the following Tests:

    Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Steer & Garbin 1988) State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (Speilberger 1999) State-trait Anger Expression Inventory-II (Speilberger et al. 1988) DSM -IV Screening Questionnaire; Social functioning and Resources Scale (Moos et al 1987) Physical symptoms (Moos et al 1987)



Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Concerned Significant Other Status (Quality of Life) [ Time Frame: Post treatment: 1 week ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    Measured through the following Tests:

    Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Steer & Garbin 1988) State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (Speilberger 1999) State-trait Anger Expression Inventory-II (Speilberger et al. 1988) DSM -IV Screening Questionnaire; Social functioning and Resources Scale (Moos et al 1987) Physical symptoms (Moos et al 1987) Significant Other Status (Quality of Life)


  • Concerned Significant Other Status (Quality of Life) [ Time Frame: Follow up: 9 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    Measured through the following Tests:

    Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Steer & Garbin 1988) State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (Speilberger 1999) State-trait Anger Expression Inventory-II (Speilberger et al. 1988) DSM -IV Screening Questionnaire; Social functioning and Resources Scale (Moos et al 1987) Physical symptoms (Moos et al 1987)



Estimated Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: April 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: April 2012
Estimated Primary Completion Date: April 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Treatment as Usual
Clients will receive 12 sessions of "Treatment as usual ", delivered 1 session per week for 12 consecutive weeks.
Behavioral: Treatment as Usual
Clients will receive Treatment as Usual delivered over 12 session. There will be 1 session per week.
Other Names:
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
  • Motivational Enhancement
Experimental: CRAFT Treatment
Clients will receive 12 sessions of "CRAFT", delivered 1 session per week for 12 consecutive weeks.
Behavioral: CRAFT treatment
Clients will receive 12 sessions of CRAFT delivered over a 12 week period. There will be 1 session per week.
Other Name: Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training

Detailed Description:

It has been estimated that 50,000 adult Nova Scotians are at some risk for problem gambling and approximately 93,000 adult Nova Scotians are intimately connected to at least one person who has a gambling problem (Nova Scotia Prevalence Study 2004). The serious consequences of problem gambling are being felt by Individuals engaged in Problem Gambling (IPGs), their Concerned Significant Others (CSOs) and their Communities.

It is known that despite the negative consequence of problem gambling very few IPGs access services for treating their gambling problems. The Nova Scotia Gambling Prevalence Study (2004) has shown that CSOs are seven times more likely to access services than IPGs "Overall, 3.5% (26,000 adults) have been motivated to help someone else with a current gambling problem versus 0.5% (3,700 adults) seeking assistance or information for a personal problem". Despite such findings the treatment options for the CSOs of IPGs are limited (Crisp, B.R. et al. 2001; Shaw, M.C. et al. 2007).

The Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) (Meyers & Wolfe 2004) model for CSOs of substance abusers has demonstrated significant success with the following outcomes: improvement in the quality of life of CSOs; engagement of the substance abuser in treatment; and decreased substance use. CRAFT empowers CSOs by providing tools to positively influence their own and their significant others behavior through a cognitive behavioral approach.

This current project investigates the applicability and effectiveness of the CRAFT model as a tool for supporting the CSOs of problem gamblers. A comparative analysis will be completed with random assignment of 60 CSOs to either of Group A (CRAFT) or Group B (treatment as usual). Twelve individual treatment sessions will be offered to each of the CSOs. It is predicted the outcomes of from Group A (CRAFT) will significantly surpass those from Group B (treatment as usual). The predicted outcomes are: improvement in quality of life for the CSOs; engagement of the IPGs in treatment; and decreased gambling by the IPGs. All therapists in the CRAFT experimental group have been certified in the CRAFT model. A comparative analysis will be conducted with the CRAFT approach (Group A) and the traditional treatment approach (Group B). Model adherence will be supervised and tested.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Concerned Significant Other (CSO) must have a significant relationship with the Individuals Engaged in Problem Gambling (IPG)(e.g. parent, child, sibling, friend, partner).
  2. CSO must have face-to-face contact with the IPG at least 3 days per week and for at least 1 hour per day with no anticipated relationship change (e.g. separation) over the next 90 days.
  3. Impaired functioning of the CSO consequential to their significant other being engaged in problem gambling.
  4. Evidence (from the CSOs) that the IPG meets Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI) criteria for problem gambling.
  5. The CSO's primary motivation for treatment is to influence their IPG's gambling behaviour.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. CSO meets CPGI criteria for having problem gambling.
  2. CSO has a condition, including substance dependency and/or significant psychopathology, which could impede the CSO's ability to understand and participate in treatment.
  3. The IPG has received treatment for problem gambling in the previous 3 months, is currently willing to receive treatment, or has been court ordered to receive treatment.
  4. Domestic violence is a significant risk based on the CSOs report and psychometric measure.
  5. The CSO is currently receiving psychotherapy for issues related to their IPG's gambling.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01340274

Contacts
Contact: Tammy Kontuk, MSc 902-485-4335 tammy.kontuk@pcha.nshealth.ca
Contact: Paula MacIsaac 902-485-4335 paula.macisaac@pcha.nshealth.ca

Locations
Canada, Nova Scotia
Addiction Services Not yet recruiting
Amherst, Nova Scotia, Canada, B0M 1X0
Addiction Services Not yet recruiting
Pictou, Nova Scotia, Canada, B0K 1H0
Addictions Services Not yet recruiting
Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada
Sponsors and Collaborators
Colchester East Hants Health Authority
Pictou County Health Authority
University of Calgary
Dalhousie University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Greg Purvis, MSc Pictou County Health Authority
Principal Investigator: David Hodgins, PhD University of Calgary
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Gregory Purvis, Director of Addictions Services, Pictou County Health Authority
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01340274     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 001
Study First Received: February 4, 2011
Last Updated: April 21, 2011
Health Authority: Canada: Ethics Review Committee

Keywords provided by Colchester East Hants Health Authority:
Community Reinforcement and Family Training
Concerned Significant Others
Identified Problem Gambler
Therapeutics

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Gambling
Impulse Control Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 22, 2014