Evaluating the Impact of the Food Support Program (Programa de Apoyo Alimentaria)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Secretaría de Desarrollo Social (SEDESOL)
Information provided by:
Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Mexico
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01304888
First received: February 25, 2011
Last updated: July 25, 2012
Last verified: February 2011
  Purpose

The Programa de Apoyo Alimentaria (PAL) started in 2003 and is targeted to communities in Mexico that do not receive benefits from other federal food aid programs, have less than 2,500 inhabitants and a high level of marginalization. Marginalization is a term used in Mexico for the multidimensional assessment of poverty in a community.

When the program started in 2003 it provided beneficiary households either a cash transfer of 150 Mexican pesos (equivalent to approximately 14 USD at the time) per month or a monthly food basket with a cost to the program of 150 pesos. The size of the cash transfer and the amount of food was the same for all households, i.e. no adjustments for family size or composition were made. The basket contained a number of staple and basic food products and powdered whole milk (Liconsa), which is fortified with Zn, Fe, Vitamin C, and folate (Table 1). The composition of the food basket conformed to the Mexican norm for food aid programs (NOM-169-SSA1-1998), which states that food transfers need to provide at least 20% of the recommended daily energy and protein requirements. Beneficiary households were required to attend nutrition and health education sessions and had to participate in program related logistic activities in order to receive the benefits. These program conditionalities, however, were not strictly enforced.

A community randomized controlled intervention trial was used to evaluate the impact of the intervention. A random sample of 208 rural communities was drawn from the pool of eligible communities in 8 of the poorest states in the South/Eastern region of Mexico (Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca, Quintana Roo, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan and Veracruz). Within each community a random sample of 33 households was selected. The baseline survey was conducted from October 2003 to April 2004. After baseline data collection, the 208 selected communities (6,687 households) randomly assigned to one of four study groups: food basket without education (52 communities, 1657 households), food basket with education (52 communities, 1680 households), cash transfer with education (53 communities, 1687 communities) or control (51 communities, 1663 households). Treatment allocation was carried out by the Ministry of Social Development.


Condition Intervention
Malnutrition
Other: Cash + nutrition education
Other: Food basket + nutrition education
Other: Food basket w/o nutrition education
Other: Control

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: Evaluating the Impact of the Programa de Apoyo Alimentaria

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Mexico:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Child nutritional status [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Household food consumption [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Other Outcome Measures:
  • Body weight [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 6687
Study Start Date: October 2003
Study Completion Date: December 2005
Primary Completion Date: December 2005 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Food basket w/o nutrition education Other: Food basket w/o nutrition education
A monthly food basket with a cost to the program of 150 pesos. The amount of food was the same for all households, i.e. no adjustments for family size or composition were made. The basket contained a number of staple and basic food products and powdered whole milk (Liconsa), which is fortified with Zn, Fe, Vitamin C, and folate. The composition of the food basket conformed to the Mexican norm for food aid programs (NOM-169-SSA1-1998). Households received the transfer once every 2 mo. Beneficiary households were not required to attend nutrition and health education sessions.
Experimental: Food basket + nutrition education Other: Food basket + nutrition education
Monthly food basket with a cost to the program of 150 pesos. The amount of food was the same for all households, i.e. no adjustments for family size or composition were made. The basket contained a number of staple and basic food products and powdered whole milk (Liconsa), which is fortified with Zn, Fe, Vitamin C, and folate. The composition of the food basket conformed to the Mexican norm for food aid programs (NOM-169-SSA1-1998). Households received the transfer once every 2 mo. Beneficiary households were required to attend nutrition and health education sessions and had to participate in program related logistic activities in order to receive the benefits. These program conditionalities, however, were not strictly enforced.
Experimental: Control Other: Control
No benefits were provided
Experimental: Cash + health and nutrition education Other: Cash + nutrition education
Cash transfer of 150 Mexican pesos (equivalent to approximately 14 USD at the time) per month. The size of the cash transfer and the amount of food was the same for all households, i.e. no adjustments for family size or composition were made. Households received the transfer once every 2 mo. Beneficiary households were required to attend nutrition and health education sessions and had to participate in program related logistic activities in order to receive the benefits. These program conditionalities, however, were not strictly enforced.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Live in a community that does not receive benefits from other federal food aid programs, have less than 2,500 inhabitants and a high level of marginalization. Marginalization is a term used in Mexico for the multidimensional assessment of poverty in a community. It takes into account housing quality (including the percent of households without piped water, without sewage and without electricity), income (proportion of household below two times the minimum wage), education (including illiteracy) and urbanization.
  • Households within these communities were eligible if they fell below the "needs" poverty line as defined by the Mexican Ministry of Social Development. This corresponds to an income level sufficient to cover basic needs in food consumption, health and education.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01304888

Locations
Mexico
Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica
Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, 62100
Sponsors and Collaborators
Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Mexico
Secretaría de Desarrollo Social (SEDESOL)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Teresa Gonzalez de Cossio, PhD National Institute of public Health
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Researcher, Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Mexico
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01304888     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: INSP01
Study First Received: February 25, 2011
Last Updated: July 25, 2012
Health Authority: Mexico: Ethics Committee

Keywords provided by Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Mexico:
Food consumption

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Malnutrition
Nutrition Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014